Infants: The Bond Of Attachment

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Forming a bond of attachment with an infant can be fairly easy, but it can also take more time than expected. It’s naturally known that a baby must be fed, bathed, and taken care of, but forming a bond is a bit more intimate. A bond is a biological connection between the caregiver and infant, it makes the baby have a sense that they are safe and well cared for.
Study shows that infants are fonder of caregivers who satisfy their needs for nourishment. This bond is referred to as attachment. Infants become attached to parents who are soft, comfortable, and warm who soothes, pat, and feed. This attachment is a natural impulse that nourishes the infant to their caregiver, typically their parents. The attachment between an infant and their parents
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Infants who convey insecure attachments are less likely to explore their surroundings. Some infants throw a tantrum when their mother leaves, others tend to be unbothered with their departure and return. Parents who are sensitive and more responsive had infants who were securely attached and of course, insensitive, unresponsive mothers had infants who were insecurely …show more content…
The type of attachment they have, solely relies on the quality of the care given. I believe that, to form a secure bond with an infant, a person must be caring, attentive, and responsive. According to Maugh, the bond coincides with how the caregiver reacts during certain situations. Although some babies can be a bit more difficult than others, any caregiver can form a bond with an infant.
Forming a bond of attachment with an infant can be fairly easy, but it can also take more time than expected. It’s naturally known that a baby must be fed, bathed, and taken care of, but forming a bond is a bit more intimate. A bond is a biological connection between the caregiver and infant, it makes the baby have a sense that they are safe and well cared for.
Study shows that infants are fonder of caregivers who satisfy their needs for nourishment. This bond is referred to as attachment. Infants become attached to parents who are soft, comfortable, and warm who soothes, pat, and feed. This attachment is a natural impulse that nourishes the infant to their caregiver, typically their parents. The attachment between an infant and their parents develop slowly through the baby’s first year (Greenberg,

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