Neonatal Nursing

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This research paper is written on infant and toddler development from birth to three years of age. I chose this topic to research because I am an aspiring Neonatal Intensive-Care Unit (NICU) Nurse. Neonatal nursing is a subspecialty of nursing that works with newborn infants that are born with a variety of problems right after birth (What Is Neonatal Nursing?). To successfully pursue this career, I must understand the process of birth, and how the infant develops. Pregnancy lasts for approximately 40 weeks, but it is possible to have the baby sooner or even later than the due date (Labor & Delivery, BabyCenter). Labor is defined as the process of which birth begins, and can last anywhere from 16-24 hours. Hormones are triggered to start …show more content…
This stage includes the pleasure from all things oral, for example feeding the child when hungry (The Freudian Theory of Personality-Journal Psyche). The second stage, the Anal stage, happens between the ages of 1.5 to 3 years. This stage is related to the pleasure of developing healthy toilet training habits (The Freudian Theory of Personality-Journal Psyche). The third stage in Freud 's theory is the Phallic stage, and this happens between 3 and 5 years of age. The development of pleasure from the sexual attraction boys and girls have toward a parent of the opposite gender (The Freudian Theory of Personality-Journal Psyche). The Latency stages occurs between 5 and 12 years of age and includes pleasure found from exploring sexual feelings for the opposite sex (The Freudian Theory of Personality-Journal Psyche). The last stage of Freud 's theory is the Genital stage and this occurs after 12 years of age. This stage includes all tasks from the previous four stages and is combined into the mind allowing for healthy sexual feelings and behaviors (The Freudian Theory of Personality-Journal …show more content…
The quality of attachment is determined by the caregiver’s response to when the infant’s feelings of safety and security are threatened. Infants whose caregivers consistently respond to distress and makes sure it feels secure, is considered to be secure attachment (Benoit, 2004). Avoidant attachment is when infants whose caregivers consistently respond to distress in ways such as ignoring or becoming annoyed, develop a strategy so that they avoid their caregiver when distressed (Benoit, 2004). Infants whose caregivers respond in an inconsistent way, exaggerate displays of distress so that the distress response cannot possibly be missed by the caregiver. However, this resistant strategy increases the risk for developing social and emotional problems (Benoit,

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