Summarise Theories Of Attachment Essay

Decent Essays
1.1 Summarise theories of attachment
The term attachment is widely used by psychologists studying children’s early relationships. An attachment can be thought of as a unique emotional tie between a child and another person usually an adult or a special toy or blanket. Research has repeatedly shown that the quality of these ties or attachments will shape a child’s ability to form other relationships later in life. Attachment theories have shaped practice in day-to-day child care and education but also social care practice. In pre-schools children are given a key person to act as a substitute attachment, an adult who will develop a strong bond with the child during their time at the setting. In social care practice children and young people
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Understand how resilience can reduce vulnerability of children and young people to separation and loss

2.1 Describe what is meant by the term resilience
Resilience is the ability to deal with the ups and downs of life, and is based on self-esteem. The more resilient a child is the better they will deal with life as they grow and develop into young people and adults. Resilience starts from birth, being able to deal with the harsh change coming into the world from the comfort of the womb, to being able to control their crying for what they want.
2.2 Explain how the development of resilience can help children and young people cope with separation and loss
When children are more resilient they can cope much better with difficult situations as they have higher self-esteem and confidence than children who may not have built up a good resilience in earlier life. Controlled crying is a good way to make sure that a child becomes more resilient as it teaches them that they have to wait for things they want or for attention this in turn makes them realise what is the correct way to get the things they want. Children with a better development of resilience can understand situations a little better in order to be able to process and cope with

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