Girl By Jamaica Kincaid: The Ideal Woman

Improved Essays
The Ideal Woman
Ideal, a notion of something or someone in the thought of perfection. A woman, the adult female human being. The ideal woman. What or who does society refer to as the ideal woman of our current generation. Back then in the 1950s, their generation had a lot to say in regards to whom the ideal woman is or who they should be. This era was basically generalized as women’s domesticity in the 1950s or some say “True Womanhood”. Back in those days’ woman were portrayed as weak and inferior. The roles of those women were to be played as a housewife and mother. The short story “Girl” that was required to be read for class does with the idea of domesticity. Between back in the 1950s and in reference to this shirt short, the transformative power of domesticity is shadowed. To create a timeline effect or of a chronological aspect, lets begin back in the 1950s. “Nineteenth-century, middle-class American woman saw their behavior regulated by a social system known today as the cult of domesticity…” (The Cult). Women were expected to stay home and take care of their children. Besides staying home and taking care of their children, they
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She was born right before the era on the 1950s of domesticity officially began. In correlation with author Jamaica Kincaid and her short story, the relationship she had with her mother was sort of similar. During her life growing up, she stated that her mother’s anger toward her grew stronger as she became a teenage. Same goes for the mother, daughter described in Girl. “Just as the voice of the mother in “Girl” resents and worries about her daughter becoming a woman, Kincaid’s mother seemed to become more oppressive and bitter toward Kincaid as she grew older” (Sparknotes). The mother simply wanted her daughter to know how a woman should act, do, and while doing so, gain

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