The Girls Who Went Away Analysis

Decent Essays
The girls who ran away

For many years the concept of adoption was masked by a set of social values. These values has influenced many people 's life. While the process of adopting a child is complex, the understanding and the discovery of each child 's relinquishing story is more difficult and enlightening. In the book, " The Girls Who Went Away", by Ann Fessler, the journey of adoptees ' mothers are narrated in several stages. These stages covers pregnancy, social forces, shame, family 's contributions to the stories, replacement of the mother, the reaction before and after labor, and reunion.

In chapter one, Fessler introduces her experience and her journey of finding her mother. This served as an introduction to many other stories
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Some of the mothers left notes to Fessler due to the shame of their previous pregnancy. The stories reflected the trouble of the mothers and the misunderstanding they receive about their emotions and how society still judge their feelings after following the social norm. Additionally, as the problem might be centered on the mother, this chapter showed how other relatives and siblings are also affected by adoption. On the other hand, some women were able to distract themselves by working and accomplishing a high status. However, the most important action that can heal a mother who relinquished her child is talk and see her children. Even though some of the adoptee might be uninterested it is important for the mother to at lest see her child. One of the ways that these women can be helped is by accepting them into our society. Whether we want to think that premarital sex is acceptable or not, a humans ' life are more important than these values.

In chapter 11, Fessler continues her story that she started in chapter one. While reading this chapter, Fessler 's story was not different from these many stories mentioned in the book. She experienced fear of connecting to her mother, lose of hope, and excitement when she heard her mother. Her mother 's story was also familiar in which she wasn 't able to tell her mother. It seems that all the stories are similar in one way or another but the most common factor is
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The power of taking control over other 's life. In the beginning she explains how she was attracted to her child 's father. Then, she mentions that she didn 't fully have the consensus of having sex at this time due to the fear of the outcome. Then, as the story progress, I saw the social and family 's control over her. She wasn 't able to walk around by herself and every little action was controlled by her parents. However, she was able to figure out a way to see her partner. This form of stubbornness developed as a anti-statement to her parent 's control. Next, she was pregnant and while she was hiding her pregnancy from people, the news were spread in town. In this part of the story, I was disgusted by the boyfriends action of not respecting his girlfriend and violating her privacy. He most likely knew that talking about her pregnancy at this would create conflicts for her. Consequently, her parents knew about her pregnancy however, she had no choice and no opinion on her own life. She was taken to the unwanted mother homes which was ironic. Since the parents had sex six weeks before they were married, they still didn 't understand their child and followed the social guideline of what a "good girl" should be. Additionally, Marge 's description of the home that she stayed in resembled a prison in which she wasn 't able to get out and have her freedom. Her decision of not seeing the child was devastating,

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