Sula By Toni Morrison Feminist Analysis

Great Essays
The Effects of Socio-Economic Class and Relationship Criticism in Feminism
Gender studies is a complicated matter of study because it extends deeper than the definition of “gender” and how people perceive gender in their individual lives. This matter involves the relationships between people and how they perceive each other in relation to how they perceive themselves. The intersectionality, in certain situations, of gender, sex, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, class, and age complicates this matter by shaping each person by their unique experiences. This exam will explore the overall theme of revision and critique in feminism and the effect of socio-economic class on the vision of women in past and present.
1. At many different points
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This text highlights the complexity of relationships and the impact that race, class, and sexual inclusiveness can have on a community. Specifically, one of the most evident themes of criticism is seen with the main character Sula. Sula portrays this character who has not experienced moral guilt and has no recognition for social convention. She is entirely independent, and she even has sexual interactions with most men, married and unmarried, in the town. After Nel, Sula’s childhood best friend, catches Sula having sexual relations with her (Nel) husband, she says, “You a woman and a colored woman at that. You can’t act like a man. You can’t be walking around all independent-like, doing whatever you like, taking what you want, leaving what you don’t,” (Morrison, 142). Nel uses this opportunity to remind Sula that she has social expectations to follow. From 1919-1940 in the text, Nel serves as a rather passive character. By explicitly stating her concerns to Sula, she hoped that Sula would finally apologize for her wrongdoing, thus serving as the revision for her actions. Morrison portrays Sula as an unforgiving and outright scandalous woman. This is one example of a time when revision and critique gave no visible evidence of swaying an …show more content…
The main character in this novel uses her writing to demonstrate typical encounters for a woman visiting a university. She begins the novel by saying that her name is of little importance because the content of the novel will not change based on her name. In addition, Woolf uses the text to depict gender inequality. Furthermore, she deciphers the common relationships that women have with other women. Woolf says, “Then I may tell you that the very next words I read were these- ‘Chloe liked Olivia . . .’ Do not start. Do not blush. Let us admit in the privacy of our own society that these things sometimes happen. Sometimes women do like women,” (Woolf, 82). Woolf makes one of the riskiest criticisms here by stating that all women are to blame. Authors, directors, and artists are also to blame. Woolf believes that women uphold the stereotype that women cannot be friends with each other because they would be too jealous in terms of physical appearances and relationships with men. In addition, though, women are portrayed in literature, paintings, and jokes as having a deep hatred for other women. By explicitly stating this claim, Woolf hopes to surprise the reader. She uses tinges of sarcasm to suggest that women do not have to uphold this standard. She aims to diminish this depiction of women and to alter the relationships of women. Doing so could

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