Jazz Influence On Rock And Roll

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“Through his clear, warm sound, unbelievable sense of swing, perfect grasp of harmony, and supremely intelligent and melodic improvisations, he taught us all to play jazz” (“History of Jazz”). In this quote, Wynton Marsalis was talking about Louis Armstrong. Jazz music has impacted the world and cultures, it shares in so many ways. Modern jazz has continued in this tradition, singing the songs of a more complicated urban existence. Now, jazz is exported to the world. Jazz music greatly influenced all kinds of music that is popular today. One of the types of music that was inspired by the elements of jazz was classical. “In the early 20th century, a number of prominent European and American composers became intensely interested in Jazz …show more content…
In order to understand the influence of jazz on rock and roll it is first important to understand the differences between jazz and rock and roll. Jazz is the several types of slave music combined together. Slaves sang jazz music to pass time on the plantations ("Jazz vs Rock"). Rock and roll has a standard three chord sequence. Rock and roll is a spin off of jazz, blues, and country music. ("Jazz vs Rock"). Both jazz and rock and roll have originated from blues but there are differences between them. In the past jazz music and rock roll have been separate, even though their time periods overlap ("Down Beats and Rolling"). A person can hear the elements of jazz in rock and roll music. In the United States rock was a knock on effect of jazz. ("20th Century Music"). Gospel spirituals and the blues have been drawn upon by rock. ("The Roots of 60s Rock"). Rock and roll may have gospel side to it but it is also very percussive. Rock and roll turned into music that has loud drumming. It also appeals to younger generations ("The Influence of Jazz"). Most of the youth today listen to some type of rock music. The variation can be from soft rock all the way up to heavy metal. “In rock, jazz found another opportunity to merge with new musical idioms, sounds, and concepts” ("Jazz-Rock Fusion"). There are many ways that a person can eighth notes. They can play them straight or uneven. There are also abundant different ways …show more content…
The first opera that George Gershwin was Blue Monday. It was only one act and it was based on jazz. The genre of the opera was folk opera ("Gershwin 's Operas and Musicals"). Folk opera is a combination between jazz music and classical music. Numerous musicals and operas took their shape from jazz music ("Gershwin 's Operas and Musicals"). Operas and musicals are different things but they both originated from jazz. “There 's no doubt the musical brilliance of the George and Ira Gershwin, Porgy and Bess operatic adaptation of the book Porgy, will continue to live through the ages. It still remains an often misunderstood and controversial story classic whose music has spawned simple but elegant songs that have become standards in the jazz music world” ("Porgy and Bess-The Jazz"). Gershwin wrote Porgy and Bess in the 1930s. Porgy and Bess was set in the 1930s in an African American neighborhood. It is a love story between a cripple beggar and a beautiful woman. Bess wants to turn away from her life as a prostitute and cocaine addict ("Porgy and Bess"). Porgy and Bess is an opera. Musicals are a totally different thing than operas. Gershwin is still very popular for his compositions involving jazz elements. All forms of music have influenced the musical theater, including jazz ("Gershwin 's Operas and Musicals"). There are twenty four different variations of jazz. Every type of musician and music has been influenced by jazz

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