William Blake: The Fascinating Era Of Romanticism

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fascinating era of Romanticism emphasized the emotional and spiritual representation of the unattainable ideal. It was a very nostalgic grace of past ages and predilection for exotic themes. We all know that seeing is more important than hearing. Back then sound was extremely important and detailed realistic sets were not the norm. The orchestra seats which had up till then been the cheap seats became more valuable. The upper galleries were the cheapest. Audiences especially in the upper galleries were loud and vocal. The scenery in theatres during this era included drops, flats, ground rows, cutaway flats standing free on the stage floor, and carefully all realistically painted (Brians, 1998).
In regards to costume design during the Romantic
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Romanticism gave rise to a liberated awesome theatrically that survives today primarily in the form of nineteenth century based musicals (Cohen, 2013). Writers for this period included: Robert Burns: also known as Rabbie Burns, Scotland’s favorite son, the Ploughman Poet. He is the best known of the poets who have written in the Scots language. He is regarded as a pioneer in the Romantic Movement and his influence has long been strong on Scottish Literature. William Blake: William Blake was an English poet painter and printmaker. He is considered a seminal figure in history of both poetry and the visual arts of the Romantic Age. He produced a diverse and symbolically rich orpus which embraced imagination as “the body of God”, or “Human existence itself.
His paintings and poetry have been characterized as part of both the Romantic Movement and “Pre-Romantic” movement. William Wordsworth: William Wordsworth was a major English Romantic poet who with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, helped to launch the Romantic Age in English literature with the 1978 joint publication Lyrical Ballads. Wordsworth magnum opus is generally considered to be The Prelude a semiautobiographical poem of his early years which the poet revised and expanded a number of times. The work was posthumously titled and published prior to which it was generally known as the poem “To Coleridge” (Thomas,

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