Critical Period Hypothesis

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2.3 Syntax The Critical Period Hypothesis for syntax, refer to the idea that the ability to acquire language is related to aging and there is an ideal period of time to attain a language, after which is no longer possible. Existing work on the acquisition of syntax has focused primarily on the striking commonalities found across children (cf. Brown, 1973; De Villiers & De Villiers, 1978). Normal children progress through a predictable sequence of stages and master the basic syntactic relations of simple sentences at a relatively early age. Despite the commonalities, however, there is evidence of individual differences in syntactic growth among children.
2.4 Phonology
Phonology is the sound of a language, how the children organized to form
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Their strong feeling of interest is both infectious and effective. The quickness with which they pick up their first language is nearly miraculous and such a joy to watch as parents. As children grow, all parents can attest to how much fun their children continue to have as they sing new words they hear and even invent new ones with a huge, bright smile. The joy with which children explore their first language makes childhood the ideal time for a second language, even if all other reasons for an early …show more content…
Generally, adults do not reach the proficiency level of children that is their learning is less complete.
According to Snow (1983), neurolinguistic explanations are not adequate to prove the presumption that children are superior in second language learning. Successful language learning is more a result of interaction with native speakers and being unsuccessful is very much related with “social, cultural, or economic barriers to contact with native speakers” (p.146). It is true that the younger the learner, the better they are at mimicking new sounds and adopting pronunciation. The brain is more open to new sounds and patterns in pre-adolescence, so it is very difficult for older language learners speak without an

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