The New Testament Summary

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Intro: In this book one can learn many facts and information about the bible they never knew. The book is not about scriptures in specific. It is about back-round information to how people today received God’s word. The reader gets to see just how important the text is and the effort to preserve the word of God. In this book the reader will find out the types of writing materials used for manuscript. The languages used in the text. Whether text was written in print or cursive. Discoveries where and when scripts were found. Criticisms of the New Testament. Books that were written but are not included in the Bible.
Summary: Chapter one consist of the important writing materials that include leather, papyrus, parchment and vellum. The New Testament
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He mentions the Septuagint, the Aramaic Targums, the Samaritan Pentateuch, the Syriac and Jerome’s Latin Vulgate as being important. Chapter fourteen is about the books that are a part of scripture and the books that are not a part of scripture. This is called canon. Book had been included s scripture gradually, but some other had distinctions and evidence that did not allow them to be considered scripture. In chapter fifteen the author writes about the Apocrypha, or books that are not included in the Old Testament. There are four types of literature which include historical, legendary, prophetic and ethical. The books that are not accepted are not included because they have not been accepted in the past in the Hebrew canon of the Old …show more content…
Two Isaiah scrolls were found in the Dead Sea.
2. I learned what massoretes were. Which are scribes that copied early versions of the Old Testament.
3. I learned what canon means. It means books that are included in the Hebrew canon of the Old Testament.
4. I learned that the words of God were written on various types of paper. Including leather, papyrus and parchment paper.
5. I did not know that the Sinaitic Manuscript was a gift to the Czar
6. I did not know just how many revisions the Bible has gone through over time.
7. I learned who William Tyndale was, which is the “father” of the English Bible.
8. I learned about the fifteen books not included in the Old Testament, which is called the

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