Hearst To Hughes: Rhetorical Analysis

Improved Essays
Dr. Donald T. Lunde has an impeccable method of keeping the audience involved in the topics as well as trusting of his words and testimonies. Dr. Lunde reveals a very noticeable and impressionistic use of diction throughout Hearst to Hughes: Memoir of a Forensic Psychiatrist, affecting the audience’s respect for and opinion of the author, the audience’s perception of the reality of the world of forensics, and the overall tone of the work. Though many aspects of this intriguing memoir pull the reader into the true emotions of these chilling cases, the diction helps to pull the effect to another level, thusly leaving the reader with emotions of awe and inspiration. Along with Dr. Lunde’s way of hooking his audience, he also is practiced in …show more content…
Lunde works to make sure that the image he presents of the world of forensics is as realistic as possible; alerting the reader of any differences in definitions from the diction of everyday life that they may not know about. In one of the various examples, Dr. Lunde provides the reader with this, “I had no doubt he was suffering from a mental illness at the time, namely, Major Clinical Depression. But the definition of insanity (written in 1843) requires a mental illness of the sort that prevents a person from knowing what they are doing and knowing right from wrong” (123). This demonstrates the way in which lawyers and such have to examine a person’s sanity. Insanity in diction of current times is commonly defined as a crazed or ridiculous person and it is used in a very casual manner, often jokingly. To the contrary, the legal definition shows that it is a very serious mental illness and cannot just be thrown around. This change in definition helps the reader to better understand the verdicts and helps them to see the legal system in a logical way. In this particular case, the lawyers that Dr. Lunde was testifying against were trying to use the insanity plea in order to protect their client when in reality it was just hurting them and making them appear desperate. Dr. Lunde’s words on the topic unveil some of the cheats used in the legal

Related Documents

  • Superior Essays

    The insanity plea is a defense in the court of law put in place for people who suffer from mental illness and commit crimes. Under this defense, the mentally ill are not entirely held responsible for their actions given the terms that they were not in the correct state of mind when the crime took place. The person would admit to committing the crime, but then say they are not guilty by reason of insanity (Francone). This plea has been used in my cases throughout history. The presence of this plea option has led to controversy in the law world; some think that the plea should be diminished while others notice its necessity.…

    • 1321 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The reason McNaughten got away with murder was because, the court acquitted his charges for being insane. This would later be known as McNaughten rule, helping people that don’t understand right or wrong. Today we have an irresistible impulse test. It 's the standard for insanity, it tests if the defendant has a mental disorder or defect. Also, if they cannot control their behavior.…

    • 711 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Expert Testimony and the Effects of a Biological Approach, Psychopathy, and Juror Attitudes in Cases of Insanity section of the “Behavioral Sciences & the Law" article, “The public tends to view the insanity defense with suspicion, imagining that sane perpetrators of heinous crimes routinely feign mental illness to escape criminal responsibility. Certainly influenced by John Hinckley’s acquittal (United States v. Hinckley, 1981), the public’s negative perception of the insanity defense led to dramatic reforms, which constricted or even eliminated the ‘‘not guilty by reason of insanity’’ (NGRI) plea in many jurisdictions (Comprehensive Criminal Reform Act, 1984)”. Similar to how some of the families of the victims thought that Mr. Holmes should take responsibilities for his actions, the public was disappointed with the results of the John Hinckley case. John Hinckley was a man who tried to assassinate President Reagan in an attempt to please Jodie Foster, who was then a student at Yale University. Both of these cases were a strong examples of how the system in many different states sometimes does not agree with what the public…

    • 732 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    “Overall, mental illness should primarily be diagnosed so that patients can obtain optimal treatment. A secondary aim should be to safeguard society against dangerous individuals” (Hesse, 2010: 2). Disorders should be taken care of to make sure that nothing bad happens, whether it be pills or counseling or both. Though, with serial killers if they do have a mental disorder, they usually will not get help and they are laying with their thoughts, until they basically explode. This is a reason why if there are people out in the world with mental disorders, that they should get help, since they could turn all the things in their head into actions that hurt other people.…

    • 1214 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In his writing piece from paragraphs 15-22, Dr. King attempts to impress on the reader that he was righteous in his method of civil disobedience to bring around change. Dr. King uses juxtaposition and rhetorical questions as a means to help “shine a light” on his justification for his methods, and then really lay emphasis on his reasoning. Furthermore, in his use of pronouns and his gentle yet rigid, unmoving tone he helps to transport the reader into “Dr. King’s world” where everyone is the same, so as these laws is hindering some of the community, the civil disobedience underway is necessary. Finally and most prominently Dr. King really tries to reason with the reader through logos, and helps use morality to help convey how his methods…

    • 1079 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Upon reflection of this entire course, coupled with a consideration of this writer’s own developing knowledge of clinical mental health counseling and art therapy, this writer feels it is imperative to recognize the humanness of every individual, regardless of his or her condition. Therefore, when this writer finds herself in a hypothetical debate with a friend who believes the insanity defense is just a clever way to get around the law, this writer would view this situation as the perfect opportunity to educate this friend and inform him or her about the details of this controversial issue. In regards to how the legal system of the United States handles crimes committed by individuals who suffer from mental illness, specifically schizophrenia as in the assumed case of Mr. Quincy, it is crucial to consider the important reason why the insanity defense exists, to whom it should apply, and what actually happens with this defense. Ultimately, the way in which a person who suffers from mental illness is treated by the legal system poses fundamental questions of how we,…

    • 1376 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    I would say that these similarities lend themselves useful to the authors in the perpetuation of the narrators’ mental instabilities. As I said in the beginning, some authors have no experience with mental illness and therefor are unable to accurately describe the escalating process without seeming overly exaggerated or unrealistic. This gives Poe and Gilman the upper hand. They are able to give their characters and stories the verisimilitude that readers desire. Madness in both stories is a thematic element, in which the narrator is put in a circumstance that accelerates the psychotic until the character is forced to act upon their nervous tendencies.…

    • 1961 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Insanity Defense

    • 760 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Legal defense of “Not Criminally Responsible” as result of psychological disorders Psychology is used in the legal system in many ways, whether it is to assess the competency to stand trial, competency of eyewitness testimony, or asses the dangerousness of the psychopathy (Costano & Costanzo, 2013). In recent years a vast number of defences has used the argument that their clients are incompetent to stand trial or are not criminally responsible due to insanity or other psychological issues whether it be schizophrenia or PTSD, all in attempts for either lighter sentences or complete exoneration. A growing concern among the public has been the reliability and the validity of the psychological tests used in these cases – are the accused really…

    • 760 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Moreover, courts were now encouraged to treat irrational offenders leniently. The motive for this was that these offenders were incapable of telling the difference between right and wrong (Taylor, et al., 2003). Irrational offenders were perceived as individuals that lacked normal intelligence. The Neo-Classical approach outlined the need of psychological treatments. The reformed school encouraged the legal justice system to evaluate the state of mind of criminals which involved the use of psychologists.…

    • 1216 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Gun Control Controversy

    • 1567 Words
    • 6 Pages

    In the New Scientist, writer Jessica Hamzelou has written a piece about psychiatrists who have to report to the criminal justice system about their patients. Patients that are mentally unstable and a threat to society must be reported and they must do this because it’s a new requirement to the new restrictions on guns. Hamzelou wants adults in the United States aswell for physicans to know that these new restrictions may have gotten out of control but it’s a good thing. Hamzelou proves to the physicians that “enforcing mental health reporting” will not only help the society but also help mentally unstable people from shooting/killing someone. Her argument mirrors to Begley’s because they both take a similar stance on the gun control issue.…

    • 1567 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays