Strengths And Weaknesses Of King Louis XIV

Superior Essays
Every ruler has strengths and weaknesses, fortunately for King Louis XIV, he had more strengths. Louis was a strong, independent ruler, who wanted nothing but to do the best for himself, his people, and his country. By establishing reforms, art, and literature; and conquering different kingdoms, he was able to achieve his goals of becoming a great ruler.
Louis XIV was born in the Chateau de Saint-Germain-en-Laye, France on September 5, 1638 to Louis III and Anne of Austria. Named Louis Dieudonne (Louis the God-Given), he gained the common title of French Heir Apparent, first in line of succession that can’t be displaced from inheriting the throne by the birth of another person ("Louis XIV") At the time of Louis’s birth, his parents had been
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He set up “chambers of reunion” to unearth legal grounds for claims on a number of cities, which Louis quickly took over. In 1688, Louis attacked the Holy Roman Empire, and was then confronted with the fear his rapacity brought, which resulted in a European coalition. The war against the Holy Roman Empire ended with the Treaty of Ryswick, through this treaty, Louis only lost minor territories. Louis last war, the War of the Spanish Succession, left France with a greatly weakened military and in serious debt, still, Louis grandson, Louis who gained the title, Duke of Burgundy retained the Spanish throne after Louis XIV death in 1711 (“King of France Louis XIV”). Louis is well-known for his tyrannical approach to foreign policy. Louis launched the invasion of the Spanish Netherlands in 1667, believing it was his wife’s rightful inheritance. This conflict was called The War of Devolution, it lasted a year, then ended when the French surrendered and gave Spain their land back. Disappointed with the outcome, Louis engaged his country in the Franco Dutch War, lasting from 1672-1678. During this time. France was able to acquire more land in Flanders and the

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