Still Separate, Still Unequal: America's Educational Apartheid

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James Loewen in “Land of Opportunity,” writes that social class America determines the quality of education students received. As he points out, affluent students obtained a higher education while lower class students obtains a lesser education. Similarly, Jonathan Kozol in “Still Separate, Still Unequal: America’s Educational Apartheid” explains that the education is not equal, but rather determined by socioeconomic factors for students in rural areas and inner-city schools. In today’s modern culture, an education is the key to better opportunities if one is determined to succeed. However, the educational system of this country disproportionally treats students by socioeconomic status. Both Loewen and Kozol agree that the system is inadequate because it diminishes the opportunity for the lower class to escape from the cycle of poverty and the very idea of what an education should itself accomplish. …show more content…
The themes that ties the two to authors is education and poverty. As they point out, America is a country that is not so united when it comes to education. The differences between the affluent and the poor a significant, these differences are evident in the educational system that seems to provide much better resources for some than for others. It is a system that clearly promotes two levels of class, and this is clearly wrong. An education should be the tools in which a democracy thrives for all. With this being said, there are changes that need immediate attention. A basic education should be provided in impartial manner to every American regardless of socioeconomics reasons, only then students will have a better quality of life and a tool to get out of poverty conditions. However, this is not accomplishable if this educational system does not change because a better education empowers good results for the individual and for this

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