Controlling Stigma In Research

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Controlling Stigma We can control stigma in two ways. We can either change public perception of people with mental illness in order to lessen stigma on a larger scale or we can alter intervention strategies to lessen the effect of stigma on individuals. In Corrigan, Morris, Micheals, Rafcz, and Rüsch (2012), the researchers conducted a meta-analyis on strategies used to curb social stigma. That is to say, they evaluated methods by which researchers tried to change public perceptions. The methods included mental illness education, awareness, and conversations with those who have an illness. The researchers concluded that education was more effective in younger people and having conversations had a greater effect on adults. In other words, …show more content…
171). Self-stigma refers to a state of mind in which social stigma is ingrained in a person. To put this differently, people who accept and act accordingly to the perception that they are stigmatized by society. Specifically, I am referring to those with mental illness. Each of the intervention techniques used are unique. However, they do tackle similar elements. Most intervention techniques focus on teaching those with mental illness about how some aspects of mental illness are the result of misinformation. Once again, educating people and focusing on awareness is a strategy that is effective in alleviating social stigmas. Not only that, most intervention techniques are aimed at teaching those with mental illness how to avoid or dismiss perceived stigma and empowering people in order to take control of their lives. This is done in order for those with mental illness to understand that they do not have to be afraid of how other people view them. As a consequence, this intervention will empower people with mental health issues to seek help in the future as …show more content…
In regards to people with mental issues, the stigma exists because actions performed by this demographic are seen to be unpredictable and may be seen as uncomfortable. The reason for this could be because of a lack of education and awareness about mental illness. Some research suggest that the media is the likely culprit behind misinformation. Stigmas are usually expressed by people close to the person. When stigmas are expressed they could be outright discriminatory or could be implicitly expressed by limiting opportunities. Stigmas can affect the self-worth of a person with a mental issue. It can dissuade them from seeking out proper help because of fear. Not seeking help as soon as possible can lead to worse off intervention outcomes. For example, in the case of schizophrenia, seeking help long after symptoms arise can negatively affect social functioning after intervention. In order to curb the effect of stigmas we can either try to change public perception or we can try to change the outlook of the individual. Both of which have positive

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