Sociological Theory Of Sexuality

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Sexuality is diverse, and deeply personal to an individual. It is defined as the feelings and attractions one individual feels to another- whether that be the same or opposite sex (Hite, 2004). Weeks (1986) argued sexuality is not given, it is a product of negotiation, struggle and human agency. People will label their identity of sexuality under the few common labels; heterosexual, gay, lesbian, bisexual and asexual. Asexual is associated with societies that demonstrate little to no interest in erotic activity (Marshall and Suggs, 1971). In contrast, in the early 1600’s women who were lesbians were tested for witchcraft (Aune, 2003). Prior to the late 1800s sexuality was governed by the church and state. Along with this, laws instituted criminalising …show more content…
Socio-biology aims to bridge the gap the gap in which had opened between traditional biological theories and social explanations. On the other hand, this theory demonstrates that there is a key mechanism linking both concepts. Dawkin (1978) believed the mechanism is the fundamental law of gene selfishness. Socio-biology psychologists believe individuals are born with an inherent sexual nature, and their sexual expression is just as important to an individual. Along with this, socio-biology psychologists proposed males and females were fundamentally different. Females are naturally maternal whereas, males have a strong need for sexual desire (Symons, 1980). Although women also have sexual desires these are reprimanded (Ellegren & Parsch, …show more content…
Freud (1953;1981) proposed the a normal sexuality is aimed to be associated as being the concept of the genitals in the act known as copulation. Copulation leads to the realisation of sexual tension and a temporary extinctions of the sexual instinct. Freud (1953; 1981) believed sexuality is perceived as being developed socially (e.g. it is determined by environmental factors such as through relationships with significant others) alongside being biologically based. In order to gain a ‘normal’ sexuality Freud (1953; 1981) believed an individual must be able to solve each

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