Samuel Huntington Clash Of Civilization Analysis

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1. WHAT IS A RESEARCH QUESTION? The research question in Samuel Huntington’s Clash of Civilizations is: Will civilization/culture be the new basis of conflict between countries after the end of the Cold War?

2. A) WHAT IS/ARE THE MAIN HYPOTHESES AND NULL HYPOTHESES?
Huntington had several hypotheses in his article. They include:
i) The end of the Cold War between the West and East will create a new form of conflict among different religious and cultural identities;

ii) This new form of conflict will dominate international politics between nation states;

iii) The national states will be the most important actors in international politics;

B) The null hypothesis is: Religious and cultural identities will not be the main source of conflict
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There is a huge validity gap in Huntington’s work. The analysis of his thesis in the rest of the essay leaves so much to desire. He has not convincingly explained how instead of economic and ideological differences; the conflicts of the future will be drawn along cultural lines. As noted above, the demarcation between these cultural lines is problematic and does not justify the fault lines he establishes between them. Besides, as events have shown since his essay was published, there has been a tide of nation states working together on the key issue facing humanity rather than engage in civilizational conflicts. For example, many countries have worked together to tackle global warming despite their religious and cultural differences. He did not adequately explain why or why not Africa will be a civilization. At best, he leaves a continent like Africa out of his thesis in a way he did not do for other …show more content…
The author does not support the view expressed by other scholars that ideological, political and economic differences among states will be the primary driver of conflict among states. As I have indicated earlier, this analysis is shallow and lacks both historical and empirical evidence. If his examination is strictly followed, there will be a basis for economic conflict. There is a hug economic disparity among the civilisations. However, he thinks this will not be enough to cause conflict among the civilisations.

8. The null hypothesis was not accepted by the author. He supports his hypothesis that the dominant form of conflict among states will be civilizational. His support for the hypothesis and rejection of the null hypothesis is based on the differences between civilizations. He does not think that the cultural differences between civilizations will be

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