Roosevelt's Inaugural Address Analysis

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History indicated that leaders are often portrayed as divine figures or heroes suggesting that they are genetically different. But does heritage and genetics really play such an important role in relation to one's ability to lead and affect their power to rule? In other words, are leaders naturally born to lead and "genetically different"? Regarding Washington's presidency up to present day, some leaders are shown to be more capable of being in power while others are less likely prone to be deemed as prominent rulers. Certainly, family value and background as well as one's personality all contribute to a leader's ability to rule. However, on the more important side, most leaders' are "genetically different" in a way due to the strong mentality …show more content…
This address he made showed his capability of how he had boldly brought the nation out of hopelessness and advocated for improvement in taking more action without fear as “[they] have nothing to fear but fear itself”. As the 32nd US President, Roosevelt was the only president to be elected to office four times. The era where his presidency fell in was during the time when Great Depression and World War II occurred. When elected in 1928 as a New York governor, he believed in a progressive government, instituted a handful of new social programs, and also called for a reform which required government intervention to provide economical relief and recovery. In 1933, after defeating Hoover in the presidential election of 1932, Roosevelt went in office with a total of 13 million being unemployed and a numerous amount of banks closed. This urged him to launch the New Deal (aka First 100 Days) which pushed for the expansion of federal government as well as further reforms and programs in the economical aspect. To name a few, he established the "Brain Trust" of economic advisors which was composed of the "AAA (Agricultural Adjustment Administration) to support farm prices, CCC (Civilian Conservation Corps) to employ young men, and NRA (National Recovery Administration) to regulate wages and prices". In addition, agencies …show more content…
This decision to enter the war had definitely contradicted US' adoption of the isolationist policy in foreign affairs and Neutrality Acts preventing US intervention in foreign conflicts at the end of World War I. However, Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 along with previous wars' atrocities allowed isolationist sentiment in the US to diminish. In 1941, US factories became the "arsenal of democracy " for the Allies against Axis Powers. Under Roosevelt, the size of the army and navy heavily expanded and the flow of supplies to Allies increased tremendously. It was in 1944 when his health deteriorated significantly with heart failures and artery diseases. Despite his health problems, he still managed to push for the formation of the United Nations and attend the 1945 Yalta Conference alongside Churchill and Stalin for the discussion of post-war reorganization until his death upon his arrival back to the US. Throughout his presidency over a whole generation, Roosevelt had led US out of the economic depression, isolationist policy, and World War II as he never failed to show how strong his mentality was. He had certainly left off a solid legacy as shown through the major significance in his achievements of establishing social programs and expanding presidential/federal power. Together, they way he presented himself through

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