Romeo and Juliet Essay

1927 Words Jun 15th, 2013 8 Pages
They blame many of the consequences of their actions on fate Quote JULIET 
O fortune, fortune! all men call thee fickle:
If thou art fickle, what dost thou with him.
That is renown'd for faith? Be fickle, fortune;
For then, I hope, thou wilt not keep him long,
But send him back.
(3.5.9) |
Juliet feels pretty helpless when she says goodbye to her new husband, Romeo, after the couple's one and only night together. (Romeo has been banished from Verona for killing Tybalt and Juliet's not sure she'll ever see him again.) Fortune (or Dame Fortuna, goddess of fortune and fate) is often portrayed as a "fickle" (unpredictable and unreliable) goddess because she could raise men up to great heights or cast them down at any moment with the spin of
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Therefore fortune and not freewill lead to the letters destined for Romeo not to be delivered. It may have been the friars decision to visit his friend, but it was Romeos destiny not to receive the letters.

Quote ROMEO (to Juliet in the tomb) 
I still will stay with thee;
And never from this palace of dim night
Depart again: here, here will I remain
With worms that are thy chamber-maids; O, here
Will I set up my everlasting rest,
And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars
From this world-wearied flesh.
(5.3.6) |
Misguided Romeo is convinced that he will defy the "stars" by committing suicide. The idea is that fate is responsible for separating the lovers but Romeo is going to one-up the stars by killing himself, which he believes will reunite him with Juliet.

If you're looking for textual evidence that Romeo brings about his own "fate" (by making a decision (of his own free will) to kill himself, then this is the passage for you.

Quote FRIAR LAURENCE 
Romeo! O, pale! Who else? what, Paris too?
And steep'd in blood? Ah, what an unkind hour
Is guilty of this lamentable chance!
(5.3.7) |
Friar Laurence blames "chance," not himself, for the deaths of Romeo and Paris.

Quote FRIAR LAURENCE 
I hear some noise. Lady, come from that nest
Of death, contagion, and unnatural sleep:
A

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