Romanticism And The Gothic Movement

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Oliver Wendell Homes, an American writer from the 1800s, once stated, “Insanity is often the logic of an accurate mind overtasked” (quote 9). Along with torture, insanity is one of the main focuses in the Gothic movement. The movement came as an offshoot of Romanticism in the early 19th century before the beginning of the Victorian era. The Gothic form had a curious appeal in terms of weaving a beauty of the unpleasant, the horrifying, and even the grotesque (Spiro par. 1). There were many influential authors that contributed greatly to this movement, including Nathaniel Hawthorne, the author of The Scarlet Letter and Herman Melville, who wrote Redburn (Blackwell par. 1). However, the most notable author during this movement was Edgar Allan …show more content…
The term Gothicism in its literary meaning does not necessarily come from the Goths, an ancient Germanic tribe, but from the sense of Gothic as medieval (Gale par. 1). The movement is seen as a reaction against the rationalism of the Enlightenment. Gothic literature also shares some characteristics with Romanticism (par. 1). For example, Gothic works embraced imagination, as did Romantic literature, but was very different from other genres mainly in its focus on supernatural events. Also, the focus on the dark side of human nature showed how dark …show more content…
Poe was born on January 19, 1809, in Boston, Massachusetts. Poe was born into a poor family where his mother, Elizabeth Arnold Poe, was working to pay the bills, but his father was irresponsible and unemployed (May par. 1). In 1811, after his parents got separated, his mother died and a wealthy Scottish tobacco exporter, John Allan, took him in, which led him to choosing Allan as his middle name. Most of Poe 's early life took place in Richmond, Virginia with the Allan 's (par. 2). During the summer of 1827, Poe 's first book, Tamerlane and Other Poems, was published. However, his book did not receive much notice from the public or critics. Although his first book was not popular, his second book, Al Aaraaf, Tamerlane, and Minor Poems, was well received by the critics. Shortly after that, Poe entered West Military Academy, possibly to get in his foster father 's good graces (par. 3). However, because John Allan would not provide him with sufficient funds to maintain himself as a cadet, Poe gained a dismissal by ignoring his duties and violating regulations. Later on he went to New York City, where Poems, his third collection of the verse, was published (Gale par. 3). In 1835 Poe 's financial problems were temporarily lightened when he accepted an editorship at the

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