On Subjective Truth Kierkegaard Analysis

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In Kierkegaard's, On Subjective Truth, his argument that religious truth does not fit in any logical box; but is absurd itself is personally convincing. He claims that religious truth is radically subjective and the “leap of faith” is the answer to objections. Despite religious beliefs being absurd, that doesn't mean they should just be rejected absolutely, “If God does not exist, it would be impossible to prove it, but if God does exist, it would be folly to try and prove it.” (170)
“Subjectivity Culminates in Passion, Christianity is Paradox, Paradox and Passion fit one another exactly, and Paradox exactly fits one whose situation is the extremity of existence.” (170) Kierkegaard tells us that subjectivity culminates in passion, it is about “I” (you, alone) also that Christ is a paradox and it takes passion to take a leap of faith. The leap of faith is a leap into what is the absurd. Kierkegaard believes Christianity lives in the heart of the single individual.
Subjectivity is opposite of objectivity, “What is true for me?” “Is subjective truth real truth?” Subjective truth is a leap into the absurd, Christianity is a leap into the absurd by faith. The absurd is what is irrational, what is absurd is Christ as a paradox, Christ as
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They were told they would have a son, despite being very old, “Is there anything too hard for God” said the angel. They have a son named Isaac, then God says to sacrifice Isaac. God demands of Abraham proof of his faith in the moment. This is a paradox (giving up everything and possibly getting it back), a contradiction. So Abraham is going to sacrifice his son for God, this is an obscurity. It is about this type of obscurity Kirkegaard is talking about, it takes that “leap of faith”. You shouldn't depend on what is unreasonable, I believe in God in time they are all obscurity because they cannot be deepened through logic, it is a position of

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