Spring Awakening: A Classroom Analysis

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Admittedly, a social justice filter was not in question when designing my lesson plan. Retrospectively, I have realised the value of socially just pedagogies towards the advancements of student participation and overall outcomes. A socially just classroom is not simply built on fair and equitable principles, but offers students the opportunities to question and take action, in order to become culturally global citizens (Hackman, 2005, p.104). For the purpose of this task, I have selected an English Stage 5 lesson plan, conducted after the viewing of the play, Spring Awakening. My major pitfall was failing to consider the total extent of my student’s identities, and thus, limiting the scope of my influence by neglecting to incorporate their …show more content…
Naively, I believed if I provided a wide repertoire of activities and learning strategies it would satisfy and cater for a variety of student needs. Inclusive teaching pedagogies must be combined alongside an awareness of “multicultural group dynamics”, hence if failing to consider group dynamics in relation student social backgrounds and multicultural identities it will bypass the true potential of student centric teaching and socially just education (Hackman, 2005, p107). However, despite failing to consider the multicultural backgrounds of my students, I did incorporate learning activities that were accessible to a variety of students regardless of socio-economic status, exemplified by the roleplays utilising only props provided by the school. The Melbourne Declaration (2008, p.7), echoes the importance of education in creating a socially cohesive society and eliminating low socioeconomic aspects as being a cause to educational outcomes. Additionally, Allard (2006, p.326) argues, popular discourse such as referring to ‘we are all the same’, limits our ability to teach, as it risks marginalising or silencing voices of the underrepresented lower socio-economic …show more content…
Maples (2007, p.273-277) reaffirms the importance of integrating drama into the lesson as it fosters a sense of confidence alongside community, by offering a lively method for students to navigate through curriculum. More overly, drama may appeal to a broader spectrum of students with diverse abilities. By instructing students to adapt their role plays to accommodate a contemporary context, it gives rise to a level of significance and engagement, as per the standards set in the Quality Teaching framework (2003, p.14-15). Through the incorporation of peer marking it increases the level of understanding of the topic at hand as well as forming a supportive group mentality, thus promoting an environment of experimentation along with the encouragement of risk taking, in turn complying with the standards of the Quality Teaching Framework (2003, p.15). The drama based activity prepared students to become cosmopolitan citizens, as such collaborative tasks foster their skills in being able to cope with change and continuity, respect for diversity amongst people and recognise the existence of alternative perspectives that are shaped by personal and social influences (Osler and Vincent, 2003, p.47). Anderson (2016), speaks fondly of teachers

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