Helping Them Or Hurting Them

Improved Essays
Reflection Helping Them or Hurting them

During the past years, there has been a lot of material and perspectives regarding the role of aid from developed nations to developing nations. How the undeveloped nations need to look up to the developed ones and follow their lead, do exactly as they did. The common factor about this week’s readings is that every country needs to walk their own path towards development. Here, I would like to emphasize their own path.

For instance, how each underdeveloped nation need the right amount of capital stock aid in order to get out of the poverty trap, a speech that has been around for many years, and until today everything is a continual paradox. But, most developed nations are positive that foreing aids
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On the other hand, the ones that did received “help” are the ones still struggling, for instance Africa. Ellerma underlines this issue by explaining the absurdity of this social engineering and the whole inconsistency of the “big push” or “lift-off” idea. It is true if they were able to absorb the “big push” they would certainly not be an underdeveloped nation. l draw attention to the historic and cultural background that shaped these nations and societies. How important it is to let them pursue their own destiny instead of pointing out all their mistakes and problems. How are nations supposed to prosper if they are told everything they do is wrong? Or simply not the right things, according to only the rich nations. Ellerman emphasizes that the ideal solutions are to start from where they are and see things through their eyes, which makes total sense. It is crucial for underdeveloped nations that their autonomy is respected and that their people are motivated to be them not to pretend being some rich nation. Particularly because most of the underdeveloped and developing nations where colonies, with no autonomy or …show more content…
How inappropriate it is to erase some countries history and path because developed nations are set up as example and only what they do is correct. At the same time, the authors emphasize how important it is to respect each country’s autonomy and focus on their assets, their culture their success in order to achieve development. Agencies should stop focusing in the problem and how all is wrong and shift this attention to what their strengths are and how they see the world. Every underdeveloped nations deserves to right their own success story through their own fights and improvements instead of being guided towards an utopia that will never be achieved because it is not based on their culture, necessities and

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