British Paternalism In Uganda

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1. Buganda Agreement of 1900 was a collaborative agreement between the British administration and the Buganda chief. The agreement consisted of the Buganda people paying taxes to the administrative heads residing in their lands, while the social status quo of the Buganda people stayed intact. Hierarchy of rule did not change. This all happened juxtapose to Harry Johnson establishing a system of land tenure
2. Githaka was the gathering of land owned Mbari. Mbari was a clan of elites and their members were permitted to land holdings owned by other clan members. This system was widely used in the Kikuyu nation and its collapse led to an economic disaster.
3. Harry Thuku was the leader of the Kikuyu nation and is known for his challenge against
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British paternalism was exhibited in Uganda through the Buganda Agreement of 1900. The contractile agreement between Uganda and Britain, allowed the societal hierarchy of Uganda to stay intact, with one exception. That exception was that the final force of authority was Great Britain. There was also a special allocation of land system. In this system, half of the land belonged to Great Britain and the other was divided among all the native chiefs. British paternalism in Kenya was very distinct from Uganda. The development of two societies by means of British oppression was the outcome of paternalism on Kenya. Racial discrimination between the privileged white minority and Africans ascended because of the manipulation of the British government, as resident native ordinances were dismantled resulting in the inability for African laborers to be successful. The unfortunate situation of Kenya overturned in 1926 when the Laborites returned to power in Britain. They protected Africans rights to land and represented them on the legislative council. British paternalism in Tanganyika was similar to that of Uganda. Sir Donald Cameron believed in a system of indirect rule that consisted of government being displayed through local authorities. Their duties increased from collecting taxes to developing community projects along with an establishment of a judicial system. This system of rule stimulated the self-rule of the people of Tanganyika instead of installing British ideals in the lead. British Paternalism in Zanzibar was constructed through Arab oligarchy. The legislative council allocated power to Arabs equal that of Africans despite their insignificant size. In 1956, the British council gave increasing power to Arab minority group. In 1961, Independence drew closer and closer as a new government was being introduced. A partnership between Arabs and some Africans developed as local government gained

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