Gender Disparities In The Workplace

1665 Words 7 Pages
"I have come to believe over and over again that what is most important to me must be spoken, made verbal and shared, even at the risk of having it bruised or misunderstood." (Audre Lorde). I believe black women should become CEOs of major companies. As of January 2014, Over 25 white women CEOs, 10 Asian Americans, 10 Latinos, and 6 African Americans. After looking over these statistics I came up with the question "How does racial disparities for women in the segregated workplace of the sixties differ from disparities in the workplace today?" In the 1960 's poor white women and women of color worked in factories or worked for other women. Those that were allowed to work could also work as teachers, nurses and secretaries, however they were …show more content…
The questions that I wanted to be answered were Age, Quick Background History (This included but was not limited to where their families were from), What was the segregated workplace like in the sixties for women? What was the dominant color of women in the workplace, then and now? What evidence do you have that race mattered with women then and now? What help sustain the racial disparities in the workplace and why? What are some of the inequalities that Latina women and black women experienced because of their marginalized status, gender, and class? How would you classify the racial disparities that you encountered in your workplace? What effect did the experience have on your personal and moral development? These Questions were either answered or directed the interviewee in an interesting …show more content…
Kennedy 's Commission on the Status of Women produced a report in 1963 that exposed, that women earned fifty-nine cents for every dollar that men earned and were always kept out of the better-paid professional positions. (5 Things Women Couldn’t Do in the 1960s) It was difficult for black women to get jobs during this time. When the 1964 Civil Rights Act was going through Congress, an amendment was created to make it illegal to discriminate on the basis of gender as well as race. (5 Things Women Couldn’t Do in the 1960s) When the amendment was not taken seriously concerning women in the workplace, the National Organization for Women was founded to enforce full equality for women in truly equal partnership with men. For example, now challenged several of the now-defunct airline Pan Am 's rules, including the following: Stewardesses had to meet a certain height requirement, maintain a set weight, resign if they got married, maintain soft hands and face mandatory retirement at age 32. That all ended when Title VII of the Civil Rights Act prohibited such instances of discrimination. (CNN. Cable News Network, n.d. Web. 28 Apr. 2016) When journalist and activist Gloria Steinem went undercover as a Playboy Bunny one year before the Civil Rights Act, she exposed the exploitative environment for women at the Playboy Club. Steinem reported their wages and detailed the sexual demands of the male clientele. When

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