Progressive Reforms Essay

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The progressive reforms during the period 1890-1915 in the areas of urban life and politics were only partially successful, with some reforms working out more than others, but were overall very successful. In the city the progressives to improve the conditions for all, trump the towns themselves. In politics, the progressives, which believed as though their requirements were not being fulfilled, aimed to make the system less evil and more fair and equal for all. They were less successful reforms in both areas, and they usually created more problems than they solved.

Perhaps the Progressive's greatest successes of reformations were in politics, due to their decisive fear for the system and its connection with the Progressives themselves. The
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Parks were introduced as an escape to nature and psychological relief. The Progressives' concern for this idea is displayed best by the town of Chicago, which spent over $30 million on the ideals of a Progressive for the health of the city. Zoning regulations were created against the slumlords. Town authorities concentrated on sewage improvement and went after air pollution as doctors spoke out on the adverse effects of smoke for people's health.
These new ideas were not implemented solely for the Progressives or for the immigrants, but for all. The era of 1890-1915 truly shows the Progressive ideas for city life advancement as cities attempted to make these conditions more comfortable. there were Few Progressive reformations in city life and politics, however, they were not very successful. The secret ballot, though it reduced political pressure in the poll, also excluded thousands of immigrants who could not read or write the English language. The town commission needed a person who could overrule it, a person to command it, a leader. The attacks on air pollution, though they showed the concern about health, were not very realistic. Some ideals, though justifiable, just weren't as practical, and were not as

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