Pop Art Analysis

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Pop art is an artistic technique that portrays to a viewer a sense of being in a particular era (Osterwold, 6). This is due to the inspiration that the artists drew from popular culture. In order to evaluate this artistic movement it will be necessary to first look at the pre-pop era.
This era occurred during the 1950s. During this time, two prominent artists, Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg, stepped outside the dominant technique of abstract expressionism. Both of them drew inspiration from Marcel Duchamp who challenged the concept of art through his ready-mades, however, their individual approaches differed. Johns’ technique was to paint or sculpt trivial objects and to make them appear abstract (Osterwold, 85). In contrast to this,
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During this time, artists such as; Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, Claes Oldenburg, James Rosenquist, Tom Wesselmann, and Robert Indiana broke from the prominent technique of abstract expressionism (Osterwold, 88). These artists drew inspiration from items from popular culture, but each used varying techniques in the items portrayal. Nonetheless, these artists were able to take seemingly mundane objects and human figures and turn them into vehicles of general statement.
In order to look at some of the methods of pop art it will be beneficiall to look at an individual artist and their techniques. For this purpose, Andy Warhol is useful because he is considered a legend when it comes to pop art (Hannef, 7). Warhol favored turning trivial and commonplace items into art in an attempt to make art itself trivial and commonplace (Osterwold, 167). He would choose from items that were mass produced and from the mass media. His reason for this, was to try to knock elitist art off its pedestal and bring it down into the slough of everyday
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Furthermore, the piece that I made fits into the goals of the pop art movement for a couple of different reasons. These are: it portrays consumerism and it challenges the modern notion of art.
The piece that I made fits in with the goals of the pop art movement because it challenges the notion of art. It does this in the same manner as that of the leaders of the pop art movement by using a commonplace item. By using the Gillette shaving crème container, it challenges the notion of what art is by turning this everyday item into a piece of art. This results in detraction from the exclusivity of high end pieces of unique art and redefines art.
Besides this, the piece that I made also demonstrates the continued importance of consumerism in today’s society. Moreover, by using a Gillette shaving crème it spoke to the continued infatuation society has with name brands. By changing the tonal qualities and the color hues for the six images, I was able to highlight these

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