Plessy V Ferguson And Brown V Board Analysis

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Within every average history class, there is a discussion on Plessy v. Ferguson and Brown v. Board due to the precedents they set and the history behind them. In short summary, Plessy v. Ferguson all started due to a black man, who often passed as white, sitting in the white section of a train. When he refused to get up, he was prosecuted and the precedent of “separate but equal” was set creating separate spaces for blacks and whites, that were meant to have “equal” amenities. After a hundred years of this segregation, Brown v. Board reversed this rule by stating that separate is not equal, especially in the case for schools. A class action suit against the Kansas School Board after black children was denied going to white schools near their …show more content…
Board, blacks and whites were not allowed to go to the same schools due to the precedent set a hundred years prior with Plessy v. Ferguson. While the schools themselves were not fair in regards to materials or even buildings, these schools still provided education for blacks and with education happens, teachers are required. With all black schools and the “academic achievement [of students]…[created] black employment opportunities” making educators not only needed for the community but the desired position amongst black people (Brown-Nagin 85). On first glance, this ruling seems unfair and unequal but for schools, this provided jobs that would normally not have been given to …show more content…
Ferguson was by no means fair, Brown v. Board wasn’t as equal as people often claim it to be today. Brown v. Board helped desegregation but only in schools, resulting in segregated neighborhoods, community center, and general society (Brown-Nagin). While the case aimed to create equality and fairness throughout the country, the way the ruling was implanted did nothing to combat the previous racism of the past years as a result of slavery. The lack of help for blacks in post-Brown v. Board world created a different type of racism, one full of microaggressions rather than macroaggressions. Instead of racism being blatant it became much more covert, with black students getting punished more frequently, an increase in poorly educated black students, and a general disease within the black community as a whole that still has an effect in 2016, in our “post-racist”

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