Plato's Beliefs In The Life Of Socrates

1023 Words 5 Pages
Many of us have best friends to whom we can rely on when we need them. For Socrates, this was his follower and beloved friend Plato. Plato was a student of the famous philosopher Socrates and if it was not for Plato we would not have any information on Socrates today since Socrates never wrote about his life. Plato wrote many dialogs about Socrates including “Apology”, “Crito”, and “Euthyphro”. We can look at these dialogs and not only realize what kind of person Socrates was, but also how Plato looked up to Socrates. We can Socrates’ views in the dialog “Euthyphro”. “Euthyphro” explains the discussion that took place between Socrates and Euthyphro at the court of Athens. Euthyphro was questioning Socrates as to why he was being put on trial. …show more content…
The “Apology” explains how Socrates tried to justify his actions of being accused by disobeying the law and corrupting the youth. At the beginning of “Apology”, Socrates first made an apology for the way he may speak in the court. Socrates stated: “For I am more than seventy years of age, and this is the first time that I have ever appeared in a court of law, and I am quite a stranger to the ways of the place; and therefore I would have you regard me as if I were really a stranger, whom you would excuse if he spoke in his native tongue” . Socrates asked the court to excuse his behavior if he spoke inappropriately due to never being in court before. We can take this statement and assume that Socrates had good morals because in his 70 years of living he had never been to court before. After apologizing Socrates tried to defense himself by stating that he was in fact, a wise man as he knew more than most men as he was willing to admit that he knew nothing. He then tried to attack his primary accuser Meletus. Socrates explained to Meletus that he did not corrupt the youth of Athens and that he was not at fault. He stated that the state had fallen asleep and would not be willing to accept the truth . Even though Socrates believed he did no wrong the courts still chose to sentence him to death. When Socrates found out about the sentence he made the statement “Wherefore, O judges, be of good …show more content…
Plato tried to convince Socrates to escape the death penalty. Plato told Socrates “O! my beloved Socrates, let me entreat you once more to take my advice and escape. For if you die I shall not only lose a friend who can never be replaced...” This statement tells us that Socrates was in fact not only a good teacher, but a friend to most of his students. Plato was expressing to Socrates how important he was to him and how Plato could never be replaced. However, Socrates was not convinced and he presented Plato with the question “Ought a man to do what he admits to be right, or ought he to betray the right?” Plato replied “He ought to do what he thinks right.” Socrates explained to Plato how important it was for him not to do any wrong even though wrong has been done to him. This also shows how Socrates was a humble man that stood by his morals even if it meant death. After Socrates explained to Plato how important it was to do what was right Plato accepted his wishes and went on his way. Even though Plato loved his teacher and friend he had enough respect for Socrates’ morals and he ultimately supported his decisions even if it meant losing a best

Related Documents