Creation Of Government

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A government is a body given authority to carry out binding decisions for a community.The creation of a government, formed through the creation of a constitution, have many forms of government ranging from great control to more freedoms. Before one can understand the Constitution itself, the founding fathers/framers of the Constitution, and the constitutional foundations need to be explained.

The creation of government is a concern for many Americans because it shows appreciation for the complexity of problems faced by the Authors of American System. In 1786, there were so many Americans uneasy about the Articles of Confederation because of the obstruction of trade. The Constitutional Convention in 1787 got rid of the Articles of Confederation
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Popular Sovereignty states that the final power rests with the people. An example of this is the Preamble. Federalism is the shared power between the national and state governments, which together , levy taxes, borrow money and state voting qualifications. The separation of powers is the power further spread into three branches: legislative, judicial and executive. A limited government states that the federal and state governments are strictly limited or regulated by the Constitution. The Constitution lists this in the Preamble, the delegated and implied powers, and the Bill of Rights. Checks and Balances is so that no one branch has absolute power. The differences in political philosophies and debates of the founding fathers impacted the creation of the Constitution by laying down the foundation with the government and nation are built upon of the United …show more content…
Estimated, there are roughly 87,000 governments. These are broken down into 20,000 cities, 3,000 counties, and tens of thousands of school, water and spending powers. All levels of government have taxing and spending powers. Almost everything has some form of tax. Without taxes, there would be no roads, fire or police departments, national defense, or public schools.

Federalism is the individual and shared powers of federal and state powers. Federal power consists of foreign policy, printing money and declaring war. State power consists of public education and safety, and response to local disasters. The four local governing bodies are cities, counties, townships and special districts. An example of the federal and state governments working together is with federal funding. The federal government gives money for highway while the states maintain them. Influence of the power of federal funding example: Even though states set the age limit for the drinking age but the federal government has used federal funding to pressure all states to adopt an uniform age of 21, by making it a condition in order to receive money for federal highways like

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