Peanut Case Study

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Peanut, (Arachis hypogaea L.) is an herbaceous annual plant of the family Fabaceae grown for its oil and edible nuts. Peanut plants are small, usually erect, thin stemmed with feather-like leaves. The leaves are arranged in alternate pairs with leaf-like attachments near the stalk. The peanut plant produces yellow, orange, cream or white flowers which produce 'pegs', characteristic floral structures which sink into the ground to grow the pod. The pods could be reaching up to 10 cm (4 in) in length and can contain between 1 and 5 seeds. The peanut plant can reach 0.6 m (2 ft) in height or depending on the variety and as an annual plant, survives only one growing season (Thiessen and Woodward, 2012). Peanut may also be known as groundnut, monkeynut …show more content…
1). Groundnut is the major oilseed of India. In India, it occupied an area of 4.20 million ha with a production of 6.9 million tons in 2011, which accounted for a yield of 1655 kg ha-1 (FAOSTAT, 2012). It accounts for around 25% of the total oilseed production of the country. Peanuts production is highly vulnerable to rainfall deviations and display huge fluctuation between years. Principal groundnut growing states are Gujarat, Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Tamil Nadu and Maharashtra which account for more than 80 per cent of Indian production as well as area. Regional estimates are Gujarat (1-3.5 million tons), Tamil Nadu (1million tons), Andhra Pradesh (1-2 million tons), Karnataka (0.5 million tons), Maharashtra (0.5 million tons) are the major grower state of Peanuts. Around 75% of the crop is produced in khariff (June - September) and remaining 25% in rabi (November - March) (Crop Report …show more content…
The microbe-plant interaction in the rhizosphere can be beneficial, neutral and deleterious for plant growth. Kloepper and Schroth (1978) introduced the term ‘rhizobacteria’ to the soil bacterial community that competitively colonized plant roots and encouraged growth and thereby reducing the incidence of plant diseases. Rhizoacteria that provide beneficial effects on plant development and growth are termed as Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR). The term PGPR was first coined by Kloepper and Schroth (1981) but by which mechanism PGPR promote plant growth was not fully understood (Ravisankar and Nithya 2012). Plant growth promoting bacteria have characteristics like aggressive colonization, plant growth promotion and biocontrol (Weller et al. 2002; Vessey, 2003) for being considered as

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