Opium War In China Essay

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The importation of Opium in China was the result of the inept Qing government, submissive foreign policies, and the determination of the British government to open up the Chinese market. The Opium War in China was disasterous to China, accelerating its downfall. The inefficient government cannot solve the problem of the widespread Opium Trade in China, which became rooted in the society, demoralizing the citizens.
To begin with, the primary reason of the uncontrollable Opium trade was the ineptness of the moribund corrupted Qing government. Due to the high arrogance, the Qing government was reluctant to incorporate western modern philosophies and technology to enlighten the citizens and the bureaucrats. Instead, the Chinese emperor claimed
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“There was nothing, the Chinese loftily replied to the British emissaries…There was plenty that the British wanted to buy from China, though, and by the 1780s, the British appetite for tea and Chinese indifference to British goods had produced a trade deficit that the East India Company began to fill by supplying opium grown in British Bengal.” (Doc 8) The point of view of this document is economically analytical. The British traders was unlikely to move the Chinese market by profiting from import. Instead, the need of Chinese tea, silk and porcelain made the Chinese wealthy. To solve the problem, the British found a “demoralizing drug” (Doc 4) The introduction of opium combined “injustice and baseness,” as Thomas Arnold, the professor in the University of Oxford, said. The point of view of this analysis was filled with anger, blaming it “burn and slay in the pride of our supposed superiority.” (Doc 4) The economic intrusion was largetly related to the carelessness of the government supervision. The Birtish trader participated in smuggling and carry “contraband goods.” (Doc 2) It is indicated that because of the endeavor of the British merchants, the chests of opium imported by China exponentially increased from 1700 to 1840. (Doc

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