Oliver Twist And Copper Sun Comparison

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Oliver Twist and Amari are young individuals who live in a society that does not entirely respect them for their social status. Oliver, being raised as an orphan and Amari, coming from a small village of Africa, struggle to gain some self-control over their own lives as they are shuffled around from place to place getting exploited in every way possible. Author, Charles Dickens of Oliver Twist and Sharon Draper of Copper Sun demonstrate that when society presents obstacles with extreme injustice due to their social status, people need to overcome those obstacles to reach a prosperous life. This has been depicted in both novels through the use of the symbolism of light and dark, the motif of false identity and the characterization of the protagonist. …show more content…
Dickens displays the motif of false identities through the change of clothes of the protagonist which makes him appear as a different type of person. It was almost immediately after his birth when Oliver was left alone on the streets to survive. Since he had no immediate family to guide him during his childhood as to whom he is as an individual, his identity was immediately given for him by an outsider. His rank in society was chosen when Oliver …show more content…
This shows how superficial class distinction is for the fact that the only difference between a nobleman and a beggar is the clothes that they wear. By marking Oliver as a beggar as a child, people permanently think of him as a criminal before he is given the chance to show his real personality. In reality, “the orphaned Oliver is initially cast into the dregs of society before being rescued and restored to his rightful place” (Gurdip Panesar). Since Oliver is an orphan child, he lacks control over himself which includes what he wears. Furthermore, as Oliver grows into a young adult, the clothes he is forced to wear by others in the society has a huge significance to him as they represent the person he is. So when Oliver “looked out of the parlor window and saw the Jew role [Oliver’s] old clothes up in his bag and walk away, he felt quite delighted to think that there was now no possible danger of ever being able to wear them again. They were sad rags to tell the truth, and Oliver had a new suit before” (Dickens 165). When Oliver sees his unlawful outfit being taken away, he gets extremely happy because he is assured that he will no longer have to be displayed as that horrid person anymore. His happiness towards this situation shows that Oliver personally did not like being displayed as that

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