Ode To A Nightingale And Keats Analysis

Superior Essays
The 18th century period produced a new wave of writers that revelled in and celebrated self-expression and individualism. It was significant as it moved away from the ‘ordered rationality of the Enlightenment as mechanical, impersonal and artificial, and turned to the emotional directness of personal experience and the boundlessness of individual imagination’ . The romantic poets placed great emphasis on the warm emotions that should inspire writers, as opposed to cold logic that their predecessors possessed. Romantic writers of this period appeared to emphasise the practise of emotion over reason; and reject the restrained order that was valued …show more content…
His poetry illustrates his desires to represent objects outside of himself, and was very focused on losing his own identity when he is writing. He liked to portray things in their truest forms, all experiences appear to be a mixture of inseparable yet irreconcilable differences, Keats finds melancholy in delight and pain. This is shown through the Odes, ‘Ode to a Nightingale’ and ‘Ode to a Grecian Urn’. ‘In Ode to a Nightingale’, there is a languid feel to the poem, and is full of lively oscillations in tone and mood. The narrator is pulled in conflicting directions: now towards death, now towards the sensuous pleasures of this world, now towards transcendence of the everyday. Keats feels weighed down by melancholy, as is presented in the first stanza of the poem, ‘My heart aches, and a drowsy numbness pains…’ This open admittance of unashamed sadness is accompanied with the speaker’s admiration for the magnificent nightingale. The speaker enjoys the sounds of summer that the nightingale is responsible for, and Keats enjoys it. However it is not enough to move away his melancholic sadness, and the speaker wishes to use alcohol as a use of escapism. Keats uses this as a mode to move away from using …show more content…
Keats had a love and dedication for art, and this is portrayed through his odes, in particular ‘Ode on a Grecian Urn’. The poem begins quietly, and its subject is stillness. Keats, very much the self-conscious poet, is looking at a work of art which can outdo poetry itself. The poet is contemplating upon two lovers who are frozen in time, and that will never progress. Keats rectifies this, however, as he consoles readers with the idea that the love they share will be eternal and timelessly perfect. The image playing through the urn is bitter-sweet. He concludes the poem with an enigma—a couplet that confuses readers, and has warranted debate amongst critics. ‘Beauty is truth, truth beauty, —that is all Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know.’ It is unclear whether or not the speaker is reading from the urn, or establishing a last reminder to audiences himself. This line almost detracts the notion of permanence that was embedded in the rest of the

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Donne writes his poem to warn those stuck under the spell of love. The spell that love will come to aid in times of need. The brainwashing that love is all one needs in life to live happily. Donne’s speaker steps away from the typical spotlight shined on love, accomplishing a controversial yet relatable poem. Donne’s lost soul of a speaker pours his hopelessly, pessimistic attitude on paper through the usage of metaphors, personification, and…

    • 1169 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    However, the poet prides himself in believing that he loves this woman regardless, because at least his opinions about her are honest. Some of the other poets he knows probably share descriptions of their lovers that are dishonest or “belied with false compare” (Shakespeare). In Sonnet 141, the poet gives a similar description of his female lover. Her outward appearance is not attractive, but the poem ends in his thinking that he is trapped in her love and cannot escape the lustful sin. In this series of sonnets, Shakespeare is communicating that his poet is terrified to lose the female lover because he loves her, but at the same time he feels regretful over the immoral affair.…

    • 844 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    As Don Paterson points out ‘with the Young Man he’s in the grip of a pure love, but stalked by the presence of lust’. This can be seen in each of the Fair Youth sonnets as the speaker not only fights to find a way in which to preserve the fair youths beauty but ultimately replaces the role of a wife and son in the young mans life as he proposes that his own poetry will preserve the fair youth for eternity. Paterson then looks to the Dark Lady sonnets in which the speaker is ‘in a grip of a pure lust, but stalked by the absence of love’. This is evident in the way portrays her as rugid, sexual and often times faithless. The Dark Lady sonnets are filled with sexual desire, it’s fulfillment and the ultimate shame that follows, a prime example of this can be seen in sonnet 129.…

    • 1942 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Through his poems, he takes the reader on a journey in which they truly feel his passion for the elusive Laura and eventually his shame in his undying love for her. However, paintings depicting love in the Renaissance express a different view from Petrarch, one that is more rational, leading one to question why there is this discrepancy and what it means. In the Canzoniere,…

    • 1786 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    However, while there is the sense of a great loss in the final lines, there is also acceptance. By standing at “the shore/Of the wide world” and thinking alone, the speaker comes to terms with his place in the world. Whether or not the speaker has come to terms with his mortality and how he came to that conclusion hinges on how deliberate his actions throughout the poem are. The speaker creates a somewhat depressing image of love as the fanciful imagery Keats uses has a darker…

    • 1284 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Although having lived a very short life, John Keats is arguably one of the most remarkable poets that the Romantic Era produced. His poetry explores the human condition by asking deep philosophic questions. Written in 1819, the poem ”Ode on Melancholy," captures many complex emotions, and focuses on the intertwined connection between joy and sadness, hope and disappointment. He reasons that in order to fully experience and appreciate one, we must also experience the other. Only if we can truly accept that pain is inevitable, can we hope to find beauty and happiness in the world around us.…

    • 958 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    “He assumes a confident, if lugubrious, voice as he takes on subjects that are both external (the song of the nightingale) and internal (his perception of a transient world). The poet seeks to leave behind “the weariness, the fever, and the fret” of a world of mortals…” (Park 140). As he begins to address the nightingale, Keats witnesses the happiness and immortality that the creature admits and begins to desire the emotions the nightingale holds. He suffers because he has witnessed what the creature’s immortality represents and begins to long for death and release into happiness that comes with. He continues to reference this feeling of longing throughout the poem; therefore, creating the theme of longing for…

    • 1028 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In Charles Bukowski's poem, "A Definition" he pushes the limits on the conventional definition of love by acknowledging the harsh reality, that it isn't all hearts and butterflies. When describing love, we tend to quickly jump into a world where problems cease to exist and revel in complete and total infatuation with our partner. This may be so, but as you and I both know love isn't as one-sided as just that. It doesn't come out of the blue, it's a desired commodity that comes with a world of complexity. Bukowski addresses this in this poem and further critiques the idea of love by comparing it to imagery you wouldn't naturally associate with the concept.…

    • 854 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Sonnet 20 Essay

    • 1310 Words
    • 6 Pages

    The poem teaches of unrequited love, beauty in unsuspecting places, and impossible self-restraint in the face of desire. Sitting idly watching your love be loved by another is a better test of virtue than any mortal thoughts of debauchery could impugn. Unclear if the difference is the intent of the writer, or the mindfulness of the reader, the polarizing qualities within each single line builds an increasingly intricate web, of which it is the job of the reader to untangle. What is sin to one is virtue to another, and sometimes they are one in the…

    • 1310 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Both poets have contrasting views on love, and the actions, and desires that accompany such an emotion. Love’s Alchemy uses comparison and parallels to show the speaker’s opinion on love, comparing it to the old art of alchemy and the quest for eternal life. The speaker deems that this in an impossible feat, and anyone who should even attempt such a thing is nothing but misguided and naïve ‘Oh, ‘tis imposture all’. Poe has a more positive attitude to this endless yearning. He addresses that as a young man, love and romance are simple, effortless, joyful things, ‘Romance, who loves to nod and sing; With drowsy head and folded wing,’ however, this is not to last.…

    • 1064 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays

Related Topics