Warfare In The Twenty-First Century

Improved Essays
“What strategic theory or theorist do you believe best explains the nature and character of warfare in the Twenty-First Century?”
War involves the destruction of physical and material strength of the parties involved. Destruction of life, institution, law, morality, culture, property, etc. This exhibits the nature of war and hence inherently in human history there has been wars, there has been fighting, and there has been killing. It is happening today and possibly will continue in the future, because nations need to be secure from threatening by other nations and/or fight for the protection of their interest. War has been used as an instrument by human beings to protect their interests. It will continue, as the human interests are insatiable as we are seeing today. With no doubt war will hard to detached from the society because it abruptly arise on one corner of today’s world and severely devastating the nations. We cannot stop war by denouncing it as destructive or by negotiating it, because no nation can negotiate on matter considerers it affect national interest. Therefore, if we want to prevent war, leaders should know what is war and inquiry what causes it, why and how war conducted in order to bring solution for nation by eliminating it cause. Moreover, we obviously need theories and principles of war to enhance our judgment of the essence of war and evaluate their current application. Through comprehensive assessment of different theories, we reflect on great intellectuals and fundamental definition of war, on history of great wars, and find how theories work.
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Nevertheless, as Clausewitz argued, theories of war is just a guidance to our judgment so it is uniformly work today or in the future. Theories are not manual for action in war, but a means to study war and a frame of reference in our decision making process. (Ch 2, p

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