The Erie Canals: An Important Part Of The Industrial Revolution

1256 Words 6 Pages
1. Speed is one of the most important factors in life when dealing with the every changing market. In order to keep up with the market, there were new innovations that came into play to keep up with the speed, such as Conestogas, new roads, canals, steamboats, and railroads. Steamboats helped to make the two-way commerce possible in eastern river systems and continuing to create a transcontinental trade and an agricultural territory. It became easier for people to buy and sell goods via larger distances instead of being closed-in to sell to only one target. Canals also played an important part with provided the necessary speed for transportation, such as the Erie Canal in New York, in which became extremely important and very profitable and …show more content…
The McCormick reaper in which was created by Cyrus Hall McCormick assisted with increasing wheat production. This increased extremely fast that the plant was moved to Chicago. This assisted with farmers being able to farm more land for their businesses and helped to assist with making them a larger profit. The cotton gin helped increase the production that took place for cotton and cotton became a very profitable market within the South, in which at the same time, increased slavery. Mills and factories were first powered by water wheels but soon became run by coal-fired steam engines, that increased efficiency at a higher rate. By utilizing coal-fired steam engines, this helped to allow the textile industry to flourish. IN 1807, textile mills that were located out of cities such as New England and New York, saw their businesses flourish with producing such things as cloth and clothing. A lot of women who were overworked and worked for lower wages, gained employment through the Lowell System, which were mill towns throughout New England. In 1816, Congress passed the Tariff of 1816, in which there was a tax imposed on imported cloth. These particular tariffs became an important aspect because it assisted with American manufacturers to …show more content…
As the Industrial Revolution transformed, a lot of employees extended their groups on a national level and formed the National Trades Union. As the nation evolved, this ended up being able to create more growth opportunities, especially within the field of teaching and law. Although the pay was very low for teaching, most of the men used it as more of a stepping stone for their career, so that they could flourish into something more, such as a lawyer. Aside from the textile mills located in New England, women still were confined to take care of their husband, the home, the kids, and the farm. But Elizabeth Blackwell who was from Ohio, was able to use her courage and enter into the medical field in college, which was full of men. Despite the snickers and the whispers, she was able to graduate college and start a medical center of her

Related Documents