Native American Tribe: The Sioux Indians

Improved Essays
The Sioux Indians A Native American tribe that has been glorified throughout the years with some events that have been place in history.We’re going to be talking about the origin of the Sioux Indians.We’ll also be looking back at the events that made Sioux what they are today. Ultimately I'm going to be breaking down Sioux and what exactly is Sioux,what had made them so special.So let’s begin! Sioux Indians were a group of Native Americans in the early days of America.They had came over the Pacific over 30,000 years ago from Asia.Fun Fact,the meaning of Sioux actually means “little snake”!The great leader “Sitting Bull” was actually from Sioux,also they were very nomadic for they didn't like moving from the position they

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    American Indian Genocide

    • 810 Words
    • 4 Pages

    During the Formative Years (1775-1820), there was increase conflict between Indigenous and non-Indigenous with the promotion of civilization and establishment of territorial boundaries, according to David E. Wilkins in A History of Federal Indian Policy. This is the start of witnessed genocide of Indians from the Mississippi Valley to the southeast and beyond. After 1815, the United States intensified its efforts to expand and implemented its coined term “manifest destiny.” According to Wilkins, in 1830, the Federal Indian Removal Act called for the removal of all Indians living east of the Mississippi River to Indian Territory. This was seen majorly through stories of the ‘Five Civilized Tribes’- the Seminole, Creek, Choctaw, Chickasaw, and finally the Cherokee. The story of the Cherokee Nation’s trip- the “Trail of Tears,” was one of the most notable mass destructions of a tribe during this period with a loss of four thousand of their people.…

    • 810 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Essay On Comanche Quahadas

    • 1407 Words
    • 6 Pages

    During the period of western expansion, the native americans were rapidly pushed into reservations and settlements. Acts such as the Indian removal act and the Trail of Tears were put into effect. However, some Indians fought this wrongful impressment. One of these groups was the Comanche Quahadas lead by their last and strongest leader: Quanah Parker. While Quanah was a very powerful and respected leader of the Comanche people who fought against the whites, Quanah was born half white, this is his story.…

    • 1407 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Wounded Knee Racism

    • 1068 Words
    • 5 Pages

    During the time of the battle of Wounded Knee there were also other huge events and things happening such as congress taking Oklahoma from Indians and forcing them from their lands in the east. Battle of Little Bighorn which was a huge battle between Native American tribes and the government where we lost 236 soldiers to Sioux and Cheyenne and the Sitting Bull which ties into this battle because it deals with Sioux tribe and this event then led to the huge massacre in…

    • 1068 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The film, Geronimo: An American Legend, was based on Geronimo, a Chiricahua Apache from the Bedonkohe band born in 1829 in the American Southwest. He was a skilled hunter and led raids on surrounding enemy villages. He resented Mexicans because they killed his mother, wife, and three children. The American government acquired land that belonged to Apache tribes through the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848. Americans who settled in this area were attacked by the Apache.…

    • 1035 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    On June 25th, 1876, Lieutenant Colonel George Custer attacked Sioux forces near Little Bighorn. Even though the Battle of Little Bighorn has been greatly remembered, the conflict was not the only factor in the final outcome of Little Bighorn. The United States government, Sioux tribes, and American citizens all played roles in the story, which all led to the outcome of Little Bighorn. The pivotal moments that led to the outcome of the Battle of Little Bighorn were the signing of the Treaty of Fort Laramie, the gold discovery in the Black Hills, the reunification of the Sioux, and the mistakes of Custer on June 25th, 1876. Many events took place on the way to George Custer’s defeat at Little Bighorn.…

    • 1500 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Great Essays

    The Apache Treaty

    • 1887 Words
    • 8 Pages

    Sumner in the year of 1852 made an official report to Daniel Webster, saying that if the outrages continued, the territory would be left a howling wilderness, and recommended to return New Mexico to the Indians and Mexicans. Attacks however continued by the Apaches. In July 1853 they killed 170 people in Sonora and destroyed towns, then later raided southern Arizona. E.A. Graves, agent to the Mimbreños, suggested to wait and see that the Indians would slowly fade away and become extinct, instead of trying to attack and figure out what to do with them later.…

    • 1887 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    He commented "It gives me pleasure to announce to Congress that the benevolent policy of the Government, steadily pursued for nearly thirty years, in relation to the removal of the Indians beyond the white settlements is approaching to a happy consummation” (Library of Congress, Jackson, 1830). At that time however only two tribes agreed to leave their land, the others were not in agreement with the Indian Removal Act. In response, the American Indians fought back on a political level, Chief John Ross who represented the majority of the American Indians who did not want to leave their lands tried to diplomatically and legally maintain autonomy with the United States…

    • 1122 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The territory we now know as North and South Dakota has been home to many Indigenous tribes including the Mandans, Arikaras, Hidastas and many other tribes that migrated there but were driven out by the powerful Sioux tribe. In 1889, the Indian Appropriation Act was passed and established the Standing Rock Indian Reservation. “The Act broke up the Great Sioux Nation into smaller reservations, 2 million acres of which formed the Standing Rock Indian Reservation.” (“energy.gov”, 10/21/14)This tribe is part of the Dakota and Lakota nations and has “various Sioux divisions and each has important cultural, linguistic, territorial and political distinctions”(“standingrock.org”, 10/21/14). Despite their distinction, both the Dakota and Lakota Sioux have the same requirements for…

    • 962 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Essay On Sioux Tribe

    • 381 Words
    • 2 Pages

    They Sioux are an American tribe of first nations who lived from back before the settlers came until they were transferred to reserves in 1864. The Sioux spoke a variety of languages, including Lakhota, Teton or Teton Sioux and Siouan. The Sioux were controlled by the Chiefs who were respected warriors and leaders. The people of the Sioux also looked up to their elders too. Elders were old and experienced and were consulted a lot they were also the village's story tellers.…

    • 381 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    When we look at Native American conflicts with the United States we often see references to Sitting Bull and the Battle of Little Bighorn with Custer’s last stand but there is a battle that was more devastating and more impacting to the U.S. government that history seems to have forgotten. That battle is the Battle of Wabash that happened in the early stages of our country in the year of 1791. This battle would be a crucial point in our young countries history and the way we would have to overcome the issue of the Indian wars that would continue for another 100 years. The Battle of Wabash or often called St. Clair’s defeat was fought on November 4, 1791 in the Northern Territory of what would be modern day Ohio between the West Confederacy of American Indians and the U.S. army. Most of the tribes who made up the confederacy fought on the side of the British in the Revolutionary War and were left behind when the British were defeated.…

    • 929 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays