Freud's Theory Of Psychiatry

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In Western Europe during the late nineteenth century, many people with mental illnesses went without help and were left untreated. Only those with mental health issues that were considered extremely hazardous such as schizophrenia, paranoia, and severe depression were seen by professionals, while others had to rely on only family members and the clergy for help and guidance (Graham, 4). By the early twentieth century, people with less severe mental illnesses than incapacitating depression, borderline schizophrenia, and paranoia disturbances were now being considered in psychiatry’s range of application (Graham, 4). This change was due to Sigmund Freud. (A) Freud believed that the anxieties, mental discomfort, depressions, and “sexual frigidity” …show more content…
With Freud, psychiatry for the first time became an integrated medical specialty, much like that of a dentist or a cardiologist. Taxonomies of mental illness was considered unhelpful and unimportant in the Freudian paradigm of psychiatry. For Freud, taxonomic labels simply failed to hold any weight, or uniformity because “one and the same set of symptoms or patient complaints was thought, in theory to stem from just about any form of disorder” (Graham, 5). The same exact symptoms found in one person could mean that they had phobias in one person, and then obsession issues in the second person. (Graham, 5). Freud didn’t really care about the classifications of different mental illnesses, because he believed that the human mind was so complex, and that everyone else’s mind was so different in the way that unconscious forces impacted …show more content…
To Freud Taxonomzing is not important. Because he did not taxonomize, Freud’s results were unclear and did not fit a perfect system or train of thought, or abide by rules. Because of this the rest of the medical field found his framework to be less than perfect.
The standard methodology of diagnosing and treating mental illness according to the biomedical paradigm of psychiatry was done through observation, taxonomizing mental illnesses, and practical diagnostic and treatment protocols. When diagnosed, the idea was to prescribe a specific drug for a specific mental illness. Because this was a much more organized way to find a remedy for an individual’s mental illness, the standards of treatment and diagnosis of mental illness was heavy reliant upon taxonomization.
(C) Through the use of psychoanalysis techniques, Freud believed that the mental illness his patients were discomforted by resulted in hidden sexual desires and fantasies, which produced conflicts from deep within their unconscious, because such thoughts were not in line with every day social norms and cultural constraints. Freud - malfunction of mental function or of neurological

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