Medgar Evers Thesis

Superior Essays
Introduction/Thesis:
Medgar Evers born on July 2, 1925 in Decatur Mississippi was a multifaceted civil rights activist. He advocated for organized boycotts of discriminatory white business, fought for equal, no longer separate, education for black and white children. Broke barriers in his time with the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). He also fought for legal justice for African Americans during that time. Evers is one of the most prominent figures in the pre civil rights era and one of the most influential civil rights activist of all time. He does not boast nationwide fame, so in this paper I will justify why he is deserving of said notoriety.
Evidence:
In 1943 Evers was drafted into the army to fight in World War II.Where he fought in Germany and France, and was later discharged, honorably, in 1946. Evers recounts an event that happened upon his arrival from the war. Evers and a group of friends were racially profiled by whites. What happened was that Evers and his friends were driven away from a local election site at gun point. But not all ways bad, he then went on to Alcorn University in Mississippi graduating
…show more content…
1970 in Brooklyn New York, Medgar Evers ' College (apart of the City University of New York school system) was opened. The school more or less just being named after Evers '. In film and TV: 1983 a straight to TV movie, "For Us The Living: The Medgar Evers Story was released. This particular movie is based on a book co-authored by Evers ' wife Myrile Evers. In 1969 a community pool in Seattle was named after Evers '. June of 1992 Jackson Mississippi erected a statue of Evers '. There is also a highway named in honor of Evers’ and an airport which is named in honor of he and his wife in Jackson MI. The United States Navy named a cargo ship in his honor, the USNS Medgar Evers ' (T-AKE-13). And in June of 2013 Alcorn State erected a statue of Evers

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    America is at War, and believe it or not it started with a movement for peace and equality. The Civil Rights Movement is recognized as one of the most well-known movements that transformed the United States, and it all started with a young man’s dream and his accomplishments along the way. Martin Luther King Jr. accomplished many feats in his quest of relinquishing segregation in the black community, but is his view of peace dying out with the rise of Black Power. On January 15, 1929, one of the most controversial human beings was birthed into this world, Martin Luther King Jr. Martin Luther King Jr. grew up in Atlanta, Georgia in the heart of Jim Crow Laws. (History.com) The Jim Crow Laws ravaged the south into segregation practically unnabolishing…

    • 1030 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Clinton became a member of the presidential impeachment staff and helped the House of Representatives during the Watergate Scandal in 1974. Hillary Clinton became a member of the University of Arkansas Law School where her soon-to-be husband was working as well. Bill and Hillary were married on October 11th, 1975 in Fayetteville,…

    • 1331 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    John F. Kennedy was one of the only presidents that for black people during civil rights and the Jim Crow era. He did a lot for African Americans. When Martin Luther King Jr. was arrested, Kennedy called Coretta King for sympathy. As a man running for president that was white to do something like that during the Jim Crow era, that was a big thing. What he did for African Americans was great thing.…

    • 465 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Racism toward African-Americans was and still unfortunately remained as a recurrent issue throughout American’s history, especially during the 20th century. Despite that several attempts had been made to fix the racist political and social systems pro-1950s, it is in the mid-1950s and 1960s that there emerges any impactful approach in regard of stopping the racism and storing black communities the rights they deserved. All these approaches grouped together into what now know as the African-American Civil Rights Movement, a hallmark in the US history that played a fundamental role in creating the freedom and equality enjoyed by most of nowadays African-Americans. In order to understand the African-American Civil Rights Movement, it’s necessary…

    • 764 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    The Freedom Summer included white college students who volunteered to educate blacks living in the rural areas of Mississippi about their right of suffrage and how to register to vote. The Ku Klux Klan, a white supremacist group, and local authorities harassed and assaulted activists, even murdered some of them. A greater division was now seen between nonviolent Civil Rights activists and the ones who after these violent events doubted that desegregation was attainable without the use of…

    • 1851 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    On June 12, 1963, a few hours after President John F. Kennedy had made an extraordinary broadcast to the nation on the subject of civil rights, Medgar Evers was shot and killed in an ambush in front of his home. Medgar Wiley Evers (July 2, 1925 – June 12, 1963) was an African American civil rights activist from Mississippi who worked to overturn segregation at the University of Mississippi and gain social justice and voting rights. A World War II veteran and college graduate, he became active in the Civil Rights Movement in the 1950s. He became a field secretary for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). Following the 1954 ruling of the United States Supreme Court in Brown v. Board of Education that segregated public schools were unconstitutional, Evers worked to gain admission for African Americans to the state-supported public University of…

    • 1055 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The book is compiled of the autobiographical writings King published and edited the works (vii-i). The book begins with the early years of King’s life. He was born at home in Atlanta, Georgia, on January 15, 1929. This was close to the start of the Great Depression (1). He was born on the same street as his family’s church…

    • 1986 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Dark to Light “Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.”Martin Luther King jr. is a black American who essentially led the civil rights movement. King is a southern african American activist who took on leadership roles and created a movement, that marched into history. Martin Luther king jr. changed history by standing as a leading figure in the civil rights movement. King embraced the idea of peaceful protest through “civil disobedience”,leading more men, women, and children in marches than most others before him and lastly became a hero that blazed a way for racial equality even today.…

    • 781 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    As time went on civil rights leaders appeared. The most popular activist of them was Martin Luther King Jr. Throughout the 1960s, King was in various civil rights boycotts and protests, helping to give real rights and freedom to the blacks in the south. Out of all his civil rights related efforts, the “I Have a Dream” speech, given on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington. To this very day this speech continues…

    • 1534 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, known as the NAACP, was an organization created in 1909 to fight for the rights and justice for African Americans (Hine, 411). The NAACP was also known for challenging the Supreme Courts and governing officials to change the way of thinking and treatment on how the whites behaved towards blacks. Decade’s later, smaller chapters of the NAACP were formed in the southern states as reinforcement in support of the black communities. A reason the NAACP was successful, was because the organization did not retaliate by violence, but instead took the fight to the justice system. One iconic victory was the verdict of the Brown vs. Board of Education of Topeka, which allowed blacks to attend and learn in predominately white schools in 1954 (Hine, 572).…

    • 911 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays