Why Is Karl Marx Interested In Capitalism

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Introduction
Karl Marx was a sociologist during the nineteenth century. His main interests were that of epistemology, politics, human nature and capitalism. Marx was heavily influenced by the ideas of Georg Friedrich Hegel. Hegel “advanced” the notion that when ideas occur and progress when opposites clash and are confronted. Which means that theory meets a contrasting theory which results in a fusion of sorts of the two. (88 MSOMT) It is suggested that Marx became interested in capitalism when he saw the “unanticipated effects” of capitalism. (64 eicst)This is arguably his most important scientific contribution as it looks further than his fellow political economists. They looked at private property commodities, profit and the division of
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This was in fact not the case as Marx argues that because of the “exploitation of labour” and “overproduction” cracks form in the economy creating recession and in turn capitalism is affected. (64-65 EICST) Marx has said that the exploitation of labour is the main driving force of capitalism. This is due to the extra work that labourers would do that they would not be getting paid for. This can be seen as him feeling the labourer as mistreated and in such paves the way to a communist society. Marx predicted that capitalism will undo itself by ‘sowing the seeds of its own destruction’ p90 (MSOST). Therefore, by this meaning Marx believes that capitalism is a “historical phenomenon” which means that capitalism has a beginning, middle and end. (25 CAMST) . His theory is more focused on the origin of capital and the mode of operation as looking to the future of capital can be quite complicated. He believed that to understand capitalism it must be shown actual developments and actions of the people at that time. He spoke lightly of the future and he refused to “write recipes for the soup kitchens of the future”.(24 CAMST) Thusly, his theory mainly focus on his anlysis of the “laws” ordaining the growth and collapse of capatilism. Marx’s law of “accumulation” of capital ordered the growth of capitalist market economies. Marx believed that the …show more content…
This centralization was Marx’s prediction that the people would suffer even more “extreme class division”. This would cause the negative effects of the poor becoming poorer and the rich becoming richer. The main point that he gives is that the middle class would be split up and divided into the two catagories of lower class and upper class. His reason behind this is that the middle class are mainly “self-employed” and so the successful people would go to the upper class. This is done by “hiring employees”. The rest would be put in the lower class which is the people doing labour. This is done by “accepting a job”. (92 MSOST) Marx later goes on to say that after the gradual passing of time workers would lose decision-making authority on the way they do their work and this would eventually “de-skill” the worker. The growth of the production of machinery and the expansion of the machinery in the work environment would be a key component to this “de-skilling of the worker. This can clearly be seen in today’s world as many people are losing their jobs to machines and in such are “losing the race against machine”. McAfee and Brynjolfsson, authors of the book “Losing the Race Against the Machine”, state that technology is taking over “service” jobs which results in the loss of work in automation of farm and factory work. They later warn the reader:
“This last repository of jobs is shrinking — fewer of us in the future may have

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