Martin Luther And John Calvin Essay

1687 Words 7 Pages
Back in early European history, there were often many disagreements between people, especially when it came to religion. These disagreements can lead to a wide variety of things, whether it be war, compromise, or just flat out tension. In one of the bigger disputes of religion in European history, Martin Luther and John Calvin vs. the Catholic Church, there was no clear winner or loser towards the beginning, once the two men proposed their ideas of why the Catholic Church wasn’t to be followed blindly. Their unique ideas opened the eyes of the people of Europe, and the Catholic Church was not happy about that. They knew they had to do something to stop the claims that were coming from both these branches of Christianity, and they felt as if …show more content…
He was originally studying the law, but he abandoned all that to join the Augustinian Order, where he really began to realize what the Catholic church was, and why he had to do something about it. He started by devoting himself to deep spiritual despair, where he would fast and meditate, trying to truly find himself, until finally, “Luther found peace inside himself when he became convinced that sinners were saved only through faith and that faith was a gift freely given by God.” While Luther was a college professor at Wittenberg, a priest came to his town and started selling indulgences. Indulgences were sold …show more content…
So if you did anything bad, you could just buy a bunch of these and be pardoned, and people even bought indulgences for their deceased friends and family members, in order to shorten their time in purgatory. However, this was very unappealing to Luther, and he voiced his opinion very blatantly in his piece, the 95 Theses. This piece of writing had quite a big impact on this revolution, it “began as a theological debate in a provincial university soon engulfed the Holy Roman Empire. Luther’s earliest supporters included younger Christian humanists and clerics who shared his critical attitude toward the church establishment. None of these Evangelicals, as they called themselves, came from the upper echelons of the church; many were from urban middle-class backgrounds, and most were university trained.” (Hunt, 450) Luther believed that the amount of money each person had should have no impact on their ability to get into heaven. He had his own idea of how people got into heaven, saying “that faith, not good works, saved sinners from damnation” (Hunt 450) Now, Luther’s ideas may have just circled around his college and his town if it hadn’t been for an invention that had come out not 50 years before his movement began. The printing press played an invaluable role in

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