Marie Curie: A Magnificent Scientist

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Marie Curie: A Magnificent Scientist Imagine if you had cancer and were told there was nothing the doctors could do to help. They told you that you only had 2 years to live and that they were extremely sorry. This is what would happen to every single cancer patient if Marie Curie never researched radioactivity. Marie Curie and Pierre Curie discovered radium in 1898, Marie then further researched it and discovered the benefits and disadvantages of it. Thanks to Currie radioactivity is now frequently used to treat cancer and has the potential to save lives. Marie Currie was a powerful figure who benefitted society’s view of women through her winning of two Nobel Prizes, discovering radioactivity and two periodic table elements, and founding …show more content…
When Marie Curie first started researching, the conditions in which she worked were very poor and difficult (“Curie – Biographical”). Even though she struggled and had to work in harsh conditions, she stayed dedicated and put an extreme amount of effort in to complete her research. This hard work and dedication goes to prove how driven, passionate, and talented she was. Marie Curie was awarded with the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1911 (“Nobel Prize”). In 1911, Marie Curie became the first female to win a Nobel Prize. This motivated and inspired women to believe they could accomplish anything they set their mind to. It also helped females to be viewed differently in society. “…in recognition of her services to the advancement of chemistry by the discovery of the elements radium and polonium, by the isolation of radium and the study of the nature and compounds of this remarkable element” (“Nobel Prize”). Marie Curie improved the respect women received, and influenced society to reverence women. Also, her prize showed how women and men are equal. The Nobel Prize was an extremely powerful and distinguishing accomplishment for Marie Curie and the rest of society. Marie Curie became the first female to win the Nobel Prize, which vigorously influenced society to gain respect for …show more content…
In 1911, Marie Curie became the first woman to receive a Nobel Prize for discovering two periodic table elements, and for her research of radio activity. Marie Curie’s research centers published many works and made an extreme amount of discoveries, this had an enormous impact on society. Because of Marie Curie people diagnosed with cancer might have a chance to treat and get rid of it cancer, which will allow them to lead a healthy and long

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