Headstrong: 52 Women Who Changed Science

Great Essays
Headstrong: 52 Women Who Changed Science -- and the World by Rachel Swaby is a nonfiction book about women’s acknowledgment in the different fields of science and how these women’s accomplishments have been finessed by men and the media. The women recognized in this book are not as famous and common know like, Marie Curie, but this does not mean their work and accomplishments are less important. It talks about the media coverage of women scientists and their discoveries that changed the world.
Many men have taken a women’s breakthrough in science and turned it in as their own. For example, Rosalind Franklin discovered the chemical structure of DNA, but James Watson and Francis Crick got the majority of the credit until it was revealed that
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For a year and a half, she monitored orphan children’s height and weight and match the results against the type of bread they consumed. She seemed discover that the bread made little difference between orphanages. She noticed a big difference in one orphanages growth compared to the others. Widdowson soon discovered that that orphanage had a cruel house mother. “Widdowson concluded, ‘Tender loving care of children and careful handling of animals make all the difference to the successful outcome of the carefully planned experiment’” (Swaby 31). Elsie Widdowson’s passion and curiosity lead her to be a successful nutritionist and helped her country save large sums of money during the difficult World War II period.
In Conclusion, Headstrong: 52 Women Who Changed Science -- and the World by Rachel Swaby is a nonfiction book about women’s acknowledgment in the different fields of science and how these women’s accomplishments have been finessed by men and the media. Swaby's opinion is expressed early in the introduction of the book. This introduction helps the reader understand what the scientists in the book were dealing with and what the current women in science are dealing with today. Although times have changed, the way women in science have been treated has

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