Many Lives Many Masters Chapter Summary

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Many Lives, Many Masters by Brian Weiss M.D. is a persuasive documentation of reincarnation, the past-life, and the afterlife. This book recounts the true story of the author, Brian Weiss, and his experience with reincarnation. He is a prominent American psychiatrist who is married and has two children. He heals his young patient, Catherine, with past-life therapy.
In 1966, Brian Weiss graduated Columbia University with a Phi Beta Kappa (Honors), magna cum laude (means "with great praise"). In 1970, he graduated Yale University School of Medicine with a medical degree. At Bellevue Medical Center in New York University, he completed his internship in psychiatry before becoming chief resident in the Department of Psychiatry at the Yale University
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He studied human psychology and caused himself to think like a scientist and physician. Because of that, he distrusted anything that couldn’t be proven by science, even though parapsychology studies were being conducted at other major universities ("[R#3] Book Review - Many Lives, Many Masters”). In 1980, Brian Weiss met Catherine, his patient. She was a very attractive twenty-seven year old woman. She had medium-length blond hair and hazel eyes. She was raised in a conservative Catholic family and was Catholic ever since (“Review of Many Lives, Many Masters by Brian Weiss”). She was having an affair with Stuart, a married Jewish man with two children. He was a successful physician, but he treats Catherine poorly by breaking their promises, lying, and manipulating her (Weiss 18).
Catherine worked in the same hospital as Brian Weiss as a laboratory technician ("Many Lives, Many Masters Summary & Study Guide"). Two doctors on the hospital staff referred her to Brian Weiss because they noticed that something was off about her. It turns out that, Catherine was depressed, had panic attacks, and severe anxiety. She was afraid of water, choking, swallowing pills, airplanes, the dark, being closed in, and of dying. She suffered from insomnia, nightmares, and

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