Manipulation In Lady Macbeth

1299 Words 5 Pages
Right from the start, Lady Macbeth displays a lack of humanity due to her burning passion to become queen. Through dramatic irony, readers are able to see through her amicability towards King Duncan, characterized by letting him into her own home with open arms, and ultimately, not displaying her true intentions. This passion only becomes stronger and stronger over time as she persuades Macbeth to commit murder, even going as far as questioning his “lack of courage” (Jamieson). Once there is an opportunity for Lady Macbeth to take on a role of power, she jumps at the opportunity, even going as far as convincing her husband to help her take part in gaining power (Jamieson). Based off of the actions and decisions that she made throughout the …show more content…
However, and perhaps because she is a woman, Lady Macbeth seems to focus more on using manipulation to achieve power instead of resorting to violence. An example of manipulation is when she uses power and persuasion to convince Macbeth to kill King Duncan (Jamieson). Perhaps Lady Macbeth proves to be more dangerous and powerful than Macbeth himself because she becomes the main instigator in the plot to kill King Duncan (Jamieson). However, the ambition that she displays at the beginning of the play is sharply contrasted with the guilt she feels later on. This guilt, as displayed by her actions such as sleepwalking, hallucinations, and anxiety, proves that Lady Macbeth regresses, as the events that she instigated catch up to her. This guilt leads to the question of whether or not why Lady Macbeth deteriorates from the strong character she was at the beginning of the play, perhaps, as a result of being a victim of her own …show more content…
Lady Macbeth tries to push everyone away due to a traumatic experience or traumatic emotions; therefore, the readers are unable to know exactly what is going on with her or rather, more importantly why (Downfall). However, based off of her characteristics and actions that she displays over time such as sleepwalking and her suicide, it can be concluded that Lady Macbeth was mentally unstable (Shanahan). Her recurring nightmares and trouble sleeping can be best described as sleepwalking when taken from the line, “I have seen her rise from her bed, throw on her nightgown, yet all this while in a most fast sleep” (Downfall). Although Lady Macbeth initially demonstrates characteristics that could be considered strong, these actions that she presents towards the end of the play show a negative regression of character; therefore, proving, that Lady Macbeth was a victim of her own mind. If Lady Macbeth slips into a mental illness based off of her later actions in the play, it becomes who she is. Perhaps Lady Macbeth has a tragic flaw of greed, when all of her ambition that was present in the beginning of the play is replaced by guilt, ultimately ending in her death

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