Malcolm X Essay

Improved Essays
The Nation of Islam adopted a young African-American male who devoted his life to religion and developed the Black Muslim movement as a human rights activist. Malcolm X believed blacks were no different from whites. He preached that white people have no right to mistreat us. He called other minorities to fight for their rights as American people. His beliefs and ideas would prompt African-Americans to be a part of the Nation of Islam. Malcolm interpreted that the Negro had to find his “own identity, develop his own culture, and lay the foundations for a self-respecting productive community" (Haley XXVII). Malcolm X was a courageous advocate who achieved equal rights for blacks but encouraged the use of violence when met with force.
During his
…show more content…
Malcolm X’s original African-American figure influenced several activists. According to Malcolm X 's speech on April 3, 1964, in Cleveland, Ohio, he mentioned in viewpoint, what America is, “And I see America through the eyes of the victim. I don 't see any American dream; I see an American Nightmare” (Malcolm X Ballot or Bullet speech). Other groups viewed America as a relatively well-put society, despite the fact that it was a corrupt, violent, racist country with Jim Crow Laws segregating blacks. Malcolm X also says, “I 'm one of 22 million black people who are the victims of Americanism; one of the 22 million black people who are victims of democracy, but disguised hypocrisy” (Malcolm X Ballot or Bullet speech). The only way blacks were going to get away the semblance of equality and dignity was to fight the system physically. Malcolm’s ideas are relatable to today’s dispute of our criminal justice system treating African-Americans and other minorities unjustly, further causing racial disparities. First of all, African-Americans today are “more likely to have their cars searched” because police officers now fear for their lives and want to get rid of violence off the streets (Kahn and Kirk). Also, blacks are "more likely to serve longer sentences than White Americans for the same offense” (Kahn and Kirk). The race is playing a huge role in this situation, but it also depends on if the crime is …show more content…
Martin Luther King Jr. had different ideas and attitudes toward whites. Malcolm X was a black nationalist that believed blacks should come together instead of intervening with whites. Besides, he wanted blacks to be economically secure with equal rights like Dr. King did. For instance, we can relate to today 's protesting of the Black Lives Matter movement. The movement frequently protests, police killings of black people, raising the concerns of racial profiling, fighting against police brutality, and racial inequality in the United States. Malcolm X triggered the start of the Black Lives Matter movement fifty years later because he advocated for black pride and empowerment. Dr. King was an integrationist preaching for blacks and whites to work together in civilization. The BLM movement has emphasized sit-ins in the spirit of MLK due to the racism and issues in the United States. The Black Lives Matter movement protested on violence and racism, but people refer to the fact that All Lives should matter. Furthermore; blacks suffered through centuries of slavery, civil rights, mass incarcerations and brutality. BLM specified values and importance of black lives but did not regard the case that All Lives

Related Documents

  • Superior Essays

    The message of unity, celebrating and preserving the cultural, social, and historical achievements of those of African descent spoke to the hearts and minds of a people who had been subjected to centuries of violence, brutality, and oppression. The leaders of this school of thought explored radical substitutes to remedy racial discrimination against blacks in America. The Nation of Islam led by Malcolm X and The Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee spearheaded by Stokely Carmichael called for upholding a distinctive black identity divorced from mainstream white society. While the Black Panther Party ingrained the deep-rooted consciousness of black self-worth and utilized the black nationalist philosophy constructed by Marcus Garvey to address economic austerity and police brutality. In short, Black Nationalism calls on African Americans to take ownership of their lives and communities through collective social action.…

    • 1782 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    “the black man in American has to lift up his own sense of values, (X, 301).” In the early period, he thought the black people were oppressed by white people and society should help African American to achieve their equal position. However, he lately thought the right of the black people should depend on themselves without other’s help. They could develop their own industries and company in order to promote their social position. At the same time, he also reconsidered the problem of all white people are evils. “the white man is not inherently evil, but America’s racist influence him to act evilly, (X, 406),” he said.…

    • 2074 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Malcolm X was an advocate for the equality and rights of African Americans in the mid-twentieth century, at the height of the civil rights movement. In his famous speech, “The Ballot or the Bullet”, Malcolm X is targeting African Americans, capturing the rage that many people felt due to their oppression from the years of white superiority. Throughout the speech, Malcolm X makes it a point to say that African Americans need to become independent, and take care of solely themselves. By doing this, they would be able to fend for themselves, not relying on anyone else. Integration is the last thing that Malcolm X desires.…

    • 1649 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    With a differing perspective, Malcolm X directed his article to African Americans themselves. He wanted to express the unity he shared with them by saying, “with the oppressed group of people to which I belong, the 22 million Afro-Americans, for we, more than any other people on earth today, are deprived of these inalienable human rights” (Malcolm X 303). Malcolm X wanted to empower his readers to fight for justice and make known that he was fighting beside them. As Malcolm X amalgamated the race to be courageous in their fight, Martin Luther King Jr. wanted African Americans to be recognized for this courage. When speaking to the clergymen he says, “I wish you had commended the Negro sit-inners and demonstrators of Birmingham for their sublime courage, their willingness to suffer, and their amazing discipline in the midst of great provocation” (King 904).…

    • 1463 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Throughout all of his works, Malcolm insists on explaining his idea of black nationalism. He sees the importance of public action to “help dismantle the economic imprisonment they have allowed White people to cause [Black people]” (“Malcolm X 's”). He expresses his proposal that Black people should only support Black communities in order to ensure socioeconomic equity; to ensure that the white people do not become richer and the black people become poorer. Malcolm was not afraid to publicly criticize Dr. King and his ideas of peaceful protest. In fact, he believed and often expressed that Black people should fight back with physical force if they’re safety, intelligence, or equality is threatened.…

    • 1003 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Instilling racial pride is one of Malcolm's most noteworthy commitments to the movement. He promoted nationalism and understanding within the Black community. The Black individuals need to work together in order to achieve the freedom and rights they deserved as humans. Segregation was outlawed by the Supreme Court, which meant that anyone putting forth an effort to deprive a person of their legal rights, would be breaking the law. Instead, despite being of legal authority, the police itself was discriminating against the Black population as they humiliated and disrespected them.…

    • 1057 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Titus Kaphar Essay

    • 1394 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Dating back to the Civil Rights Era, where there were local and state laws that segregated the blacks from the whites. In Cultural Diversity in American Art History, Cadge-Moore points out that, “Desegregation of public facilities, access to voting rights, equal rights to employment, and rights to protest and march all became goals of the growing movement in the early 1960s” (235). Africans Americans were tired of being mistreated from the people of the society therefore they protested for their rights. As a result, African Americans were faced with violence by police brutality as some prosecutors were beaten to death. Titus Kaphar may have not witnessed the Civil Rights Era and the segregation, but he acknowledges the suffering that the African Americans had to face.…

    • 1394 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Just like other races elsewhere had done, he called upon the black society to patronize their own kind if, when, and where possible. He advocated separation and opposed forced segregation by the supposedly superior whites and affluent blacks in society. In its place, Malcolm proposed voluntary separation by two equals (Cone, 173). For King, society needed harmony between the American Dream and the Christian Church. Nevertheless, he criticized Christianity and the dream, prompting him to fight for an end to racism and incorporation of…

    • 503 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The followers of the Black Power movement were made up of a new generation of black radicals demanding improvements for their rights and economic capabilities. Malcolm X’s condoning of violence is what made him appealing to these radicals, who also opposed Martin Luther King’s “love thine enemy” approach. X motivated the new generation of leaders, like SNCC’s Stokely Carmichael. Generally, the Black Power movement is seen as a rejection to the techniques of the Civil Rights…

    • 1197 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    It’s because racial bias from law enforcement and it is targeted at Black Americans. The rise of police brutality is only making American citizens grow not only a hatred, but a fear for the people who are supposed to be protecting everyone. And it’s funny because if you put ‘’C’’ in front of the word ‘’OP’’ you figure just out, who’s your biggest threat. It’s common for people to have cell phones, which mean more proof is found that police brutality is only becoming a bigger problem. It is found that police officers shoot and kill blacks twice as much as any other race.…

    • 1212 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays