Tic Themes In Faulkner's A Rose For Emily

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thic Themes in “A Rose for Emily”
In the early twentieth century, Southern regional Gothicism arose. One of the most widely recognized writers to use this style was William Faulkner. The Southern Gothic style embraces much of the same essential components of the Gothic such as macabre and grotesque events, but also employs much irony to catechize the values of the American South. William Faulkner’s short-story “A Rose for Emily” is an exceptional example of this style of writing. Faulkner, the American short-story writer and novelist, was born on September 25, 1897, in New Albany, Mississippi. From an early age, Faulkner new he wanted to be a writer just like his great-grandfather, William C. Falkner. Faulkner’s family moved to Oxford, Mississippi,
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One of the most important contributing factors to Faulkner’s success in writing was his friendship with Phil Stone. Faulkner and Stone became acquainted in 1914. Several years older than Faulkner and a scholar, Stone saw potential in the seventeen year old William Faulkner. Stone introduced Faulkner to the literary movement going on at that time, which was the Modernist movement. Shortly after the commencement of the twentieth century, up to 1965, was the time period of this literary movement. The Modernist era can be described as a moral shift, where people began to break free of traditional points of view and the way they interacted with the world as a whole. Things that were once discouraged, such as individualism and experimentation, became virtuous and acceptable (Pappalardo 193). Stone’s suggestions and advice were building blocks that helped mold the great writer Faulkner was to become (Brooks and Perkins …show more content…
He is most known for the way in which he captures the raw aesthetics of pre-Civil War South, along with all the dark and twisted complexities involved with the Southern Gothic genre. Faulkner’s preferred style of writing employs the stream of consciousness technique, in which the speaker of the story tells events as he or she remembers them allowing an internal view; providing insight on the plot and direction of the story. This difficult technique of narration allows the reader to be part of the “conscious experience” or events being told in the story (Mepham 1). His creation of Yoknapatawpha County, the setting for most of his literary

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