'Symptoms Of Love In Robert Graves Meeting At Night'

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Love Sometimes love can be wretched. And other times it can be exciting and charming. In these works of literature, love can be interpreted in many ways. Depending on certain situations that the writer is trying to express, changes how the characters see love. Love can be a complex thing to understand; it can take any perspective. The writers use imagery and tone to interpret the type of love they’re feeling. The poems can use descriptive imagery and have fast rhythm to express the excitement of love, as in “Meeting at night.” Or the meaning can be more profound and have a satirical tone to express bitterness towards love, like in “Symptoms of Love.” Love can even be interpreted differently depending on gender. Even though each of these poems …show more content…
He certainly takes a different stand point on how he feels about love. Instead of displaying love as a perfect, he thinks the opposite. The tone of this poem comes off as informative but satirical and cynical. Graves sees love as a weakness. He sees it as a distraction that ‘blots out reason’. As he says in the beginning of the poem “love is a universal migraine” (Graves 577). He describes love as a sickness to symbolize the multiple problems you face in a relationship. His outlook on love can be seen as harsh and bitter, but I think he’s just stating truth about the cliché perception of …show more content…
Like “Symptoms of Love,” this poem is also not the traditional happy approach to love. The speaker is reminiscing about the moments in his relationship that led to its demise. Hardy uses somber and frigid imagery to convey death and the hopelessness of the things around him. He describes the sun as ‘white’ and ‘chidden of God’ to symbolize the frigidity and dreariness of not only his atmosphere, but his relationship. Some see neutrality as a good ending of a relationship, but he sees it as lacking logic and emotion. At the end, he realizes love can deceive you. He uses the colorless metaphor a second time, but in a simpler

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