Louisiana Purchase Analysis

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The Louisiana Purchase Negotiations and the Constitutionality of the Purchase The negotiations pertaining to the acquisition of the Louisiana Territory from France began prior to Robert Livingston departing for formal dialogues in France with Bonaparte. The earliest stage was when Livingston went to France to engage in an intake process to determine Frances plan for the Louisiana Territory. Prior to the final negotiations, Livingston made intense efforts to tap into what the French were hiding as a means to figure out their weakness. The United States was always a step ahead of France because they were already aware of the Spain transferring power over the territory back to France. These points are verifiable with an excerpt from “An Immense …show more content…
When an individual or a group holds a constitutionalist perspective, it means the principles they stand by are influenced by the United States Constitutions and its contents. The Federalist Party did not view the Louisiana Purchase as being in harmony with the values expressed in the Constitution. His article “Party Politics during the Louisiana Purchase”, Sean Theriault explores how the various parties of the era had the tendency to flip-flop with regards to their views on certain issues. Additionally, he explores voting patterns amongst members of the various parties, and the arguments for and against the Louisiana Purchase that were held members of each part. In his essay, Theriault cites Congressmen Roger Griswold as …show more content…
On the one hand, Jefferson recognized Frances point of vulnerability and the necessity of the United States to maintain access to the ports at New Orleans and acted in his best judgment. On the other hand, President Jefferson prided himself for his strict adherence to the ideologies expressed in the United States Constitution and was struggling with whether or not the transfer of power from the France to the United State over the region of Louisiana in its entirety violated the U.S. Constitution. The attribute the distinguishes President Jefferson and Jeffersonian Republicans from the Federalist Party and its leaders like Alexander Hamilton and Roger Griswold, is Jefferson’s willingness to contemplate the matter and figure things out. The article “Louisiana Purchase” from “Shaping of America”, 1783-1815 Reference Library, 2006 illustrates the conflict of conscience that was plaguing President Jefferson when it says: When news of the agreement reached Jefferson in mid-May 1803, he was thrilled but conflicted. Congress had only authorized a little over $9 million to be spent, not $15 million. More important, he did not think the Constitution gave the U.S. government the power to buy a huge expanse of land. Throughout his public career, Jefferson had always insisted that the Constitution

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