Loss Of Faith In Night By Elie Wiesel

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Approximately 1 out of every 6 Auschwitz concentration camp prisoner was murdered, fortunately Eliezer Wiesel defeated those odds and came out of it as a survivor. The book ‘Night’ is a memoir written by holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel who paints a clear picture on his experience of being forced to leave everything that made him who he was, to coming out of the camp: Auschwitz-Birkenau, nearly on the brink of death. His book demonstrates the callousness of the Nazi party and the suffering he and his people faced day and night, never getting a break from the experimental torture, gas chambers, starvation, illnesses and death knocking at their door. Being a prisoner at Auschwitz, Wiesel 's overall identity took a turn as he lost his faith in god …show more content…
Towards the beginning of his journey, wiesel started out his day and ended his day with a prayer, and he questioned religion and took great interest in it. “Man comes closer to God through the questions he asks Him, he liked to say. Therein lies true dialogue. Man asks and God replies. But we don 't understand His replies. We cannot understand them. Because they dwell in the depths of our souls and remain there until we die. The real answers, Eliezer, you will find only within yourself,” (Wiesel,5). This piece of evidence supports the idea of Elies ideals on religion and his eagerness to learn. He undoubtedly had faith in a god and before the holocaust he was able to find peace in these unknowns. It also shows his mentality and innocent thoughts before he witnesses atrocities no one should see, let alone a child and question his unshakeable faith. Even undergoing the transition of being forced to leave everything that made him who he was as an individual, he never questioned his faith in god. "Yisgadal, veyiskadash, shmey raba…May His name be celebrated and sanctified…" whispered my father. For the first time, I felt anger rising within me. Why should I sanctify His name? The Almighty, the eternal and terrible Master of the Universe, chose to be silent. What was there to thank Him for?” (Wiesel, 33). At this point Elie 's peaceful thoughts on his faith had quickly been replaced with anger. He …show more content…
While in the camp, the Jews were abused, starved, and murdered. By the end of the book, Wiesel has adopted an indifferent attitude toward his own life. He writes, “It no longer mattered. After my father’s death, nothing could touch me anymore” (Wiesel,107). Previous to his father’s death, there were times when Elie watched the Nazis abuse his father and, though he did not react, he felt remorse, anger, and a desire to “sink my nails into the criminal’s flesh” (Wiesel,37) to defend his father. These indecisive thoughts on whether he should try to help his father or ignore it and survive just like everybody else during these times. Elie and his father were side by side for the majority of the holocaust and they constantly aided each other. But once his father had fallen ill, Elie often questioned whether his father was worth holding onto. This was a normal thing in the holocaust and the reason Elie regretted having those thoughts was because in jewish culture, family was a key part of it and wishing death upon your loved ones was shameful. But the indifference of whether or not he lived after the idea of his father 's passing allowed him to quickly adopt the idea of his own death.” I remained in Buchenwald until April 11. I shall not describe my life during that period. It no longer mattered. Since my father 's death, nothing mattered to

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