Night By Elie Wiesel Silence Analysis

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Scientifically, silence is no more than merely a lack of sound. An environment and all it possesses are delicately harmonic, radiating a simply serene aura. On the other hand, silence is much more complicated as it impacts human expression and stability. When one is forced into silence, there can be evidence of imprisonment, torment, and intellectual change. In Night written by Elie Wiesel, the story of his experience during the Holocaust, silence is given an entirely new definition. Wiesel enters two concentration camps with ignorance, but he survives with varying levels of pain and fear that cause an internal hush. This proves to be true for others around him as well. After Elie Wiesel goes through a traumatic, life-changing struggle and …show more content…
Wiesel 's varying levels of pain and despair cause him the same kind of uniform, expression restraints. Despite a sensitizing arrival at the first concentration camp, Auschwitz-Birkenau, and the excruciating loss of his mother and younger sister, Elie is not struck with his first truly silencing pain until a short time afterwards. Elie and his father are forced into a small room with other inmates when Elie 's father is struck abruptly with colic; because of this he walks up to a gypsy that is watching over them and asks if he can use the restroom. Instead of allowing him to use the bathroom, the gypsy looks at him as if he is an animal and slaps him so hard that he falls to the ground. Wiesel, knowing that he would be hurt worse if he defended his father, remains silent and stays in place. "My father had just been struck, before my very eyes, and I had not flickered an eyelid. I had looked on and said nothing... His cheek still bore the red mark of the man 's hand." (Wiesel 26). As Elie Wiesel watches his father crawl back over to him, there is a certain pain and fear that causes him to remain silent. Wiesel quickly conditions himself to behave in a manner that ensures he will be …show more content…
After first arriving, Wiesel is silenced by the empathetic pain he feels towards his father after he is beaten. Then that pain is translated into Wiesel 's own physical trauma as he is whipped by a tormentor and silenced. Finally, on top of everything else, the pain that came from grieving the lives that were instantly sentenced to their deaths increased the silence to maximum restricting capacity. Scientifically, silence is an inevitable part of life: whether it 's caused by natural events or an overflow of negative emotion. However, no matter what the case, silence can be

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